Charlie’s Sunday Quote

Charlie Chaplin and Jackie Coogan in The Kid

Charlie Chaplin and Jackie Coogan in The Kid (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

We think too much and feel too little.” ~ Charlie Chaplin

Hope you are enjoying these Sunday quotes from Charlie Chaplin and I hope you enjoy this hilarious video from Youtube of Charlie Chaplin in The Bank.

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

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Charlie’s Sunday Quote

English: Bronze, life size Charlie; co-commiss...

English: Bronze, life size Charlie; co-commissioned by the Chaplin estate and IRD Waterville Co. Kerry. It is the only official Statue shown to express his famous smile. Sculpted by Alan Ryan Hall, Valentia Island Co. Kerry (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Look up to the sky. You’ll never find rainbows if you’re looking down.” ~ Charlie Chaplin

 

 

Charlie’s Sunday Quote

Charlie Chaplin and Jackie Coogan in The Kid

Charlie Chaplin and Jackie Coogan in The Kid (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

I do not have much patience with a thing of beauty that must be explained to be understood. If it does need additional interpretation by someone other than the creator, then I question whether it has full-filled its purpose.” ~ Charlie Chaplin

 

 

Friday Facts

Cover of magazine "The Flapper" for ...

Cover of magazine “The Flapper” for November 1922. Shows actress Billie Dove in football uniform. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hello Again and welcome to Friday Facts, where I grab an article or any sort of a write-up about the silent-era by those who lived through it. This week I’ve come across an article from November 1922, of an interview with Colleen Moore by Gladys Hall for the Chicago Daily News. This article went under the heading The Flapper and it had a byline of Flappers Here to Stay, Says Colleen Moore. What is also noticeable in the article is the header which states: ‘Not For Old Fogies’, so this article which rightly was promoting the cause of Feminism, was at the same time indulging in agism – Mmmmm! Brilliant article though, so please enjoy:

Film Still of Colleen Moore as "Pink"...

Film Still of Colleen Moore as “Pink” Watson with Joe Yule Jr., who would later become Mickey Rooney, in Orchids and Ermine. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“One day, not so very long ago, Colleen Moore and I had luncheon together. I don’t suppose I ever met anybody so enthusiastic as Colleen. Even about the subway, upon which – or rather, within which – she had been spending most of her New York visit, frequently getting lost, but gallantly persisting, none the less. Flappers came up – in conversation, I mean – and I found Colleen as enthusiastic for the maligned misses as most doleful individuals are against them!”

Flapper #2

Flapper #2 (Photo credit: girlwparasol)

“‘Why’, said Colleen, with her head slightly to one side, an alert little manner, sort of characteristic of a humming bird, ‘Why, I’m a flapper myself!’ Colleen is twenty-one, correct flapper age, at any rate – but somehow, until she mentioned it, I really hadn’t catalogued her as precisely that. Flappers don’t generally do as much as Colleen, and they are more blase – about the subway.”

Page from magazine "The Flapper" for...

Page from magazine “The Flapper” for November 1922. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“A flapper,” Colleen went on, with wisdom, ‘is just a little girl trying to grow up – in the process of growing up. She wears flapper clothes out of mischief – because she thinks them rather smart and naughty. And what everyday, healthy, normal little girl doesn’t sort of like to be smart and naughty?”

Colleen Moore in Lilac Time

Colleen Moore in Lilac Time (Photo credit: cliff1066™)

“‘Little Lady Flapper is really old-fashioned; but in her efforts not to let anyone discover that her true ideal is love-in-a-cottage, she ‘flaps’ in the most desperately modern manner. Left to her own devices she would probably dance and flirt just as girls have always done – but honest, I don’t think she’d wear her skirts so short!”

Colleen Moore

Colleen Moore (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“‘She likes her freedom, and she likes to be a bit daring, and snap her cunning, little manicured fingers in the face of the world; but fundamentally she is the same sort of girl as grandmamma was when she was young. The chief difference is that she has more ambition, and there are more things for her to wish for, and a greater chance of getting them. She demands more of men because she knows more about their work.”

colleen moore dance

colleen moore dance (Photo credit: carbonated)

“‘She uses lipstick and powder and rouge because, like every small girl, she apes her elders. She knows more of life than her mother did at the same age because she sees more of it. She knows what she wants and what she is doing, all of the time – and she meets life with a small and an eager, ardent hope. She’s a trim little craft and brave!”

Flapper in 1920s..

Flapper in 1920s.. (Photo credit: joanneteh_32(On Instagram as Austenland))

“‘The flapper has charm, good looks, good clothes, intellect and a healthy point of view. I’m proud to ‘flap’ – I am!'” -END

Colleen moore 1

Colleen moore 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And so you have it. Great article and great interview, in fact there wasn’t a whole lot of difference between the struggles of life and the quest to enjoy life today compared to ninety years ago. This is another article that has being republished on the http://www.oldmagazines.com website; I hope you’re enjoying them; I’ll be back next week with another! Bye for now!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Short Film: Dirty Money

Here’s a short silent film with Nenagh SIlent Film Festival Friend and Fair City actor Bryan Murray, which was directed by Kevin McGee. Let’s see if we can get it up to a thousand views.

 

Charlie’s Sunday Quote

English: Gandhi meets with Charlie Chaplin at ...

English: Gandhi meets with Charlie Chaplin at the home of Gandhi’s friend Dr. Chuni Lal Katial in Canning Town, London, September 22, 1931. Sarojini Naidu is standing on the right. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What do you want meaning for? Life is desire, not meaning.” ~ Charlie Chaplin



Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

 

Friday Facts

Rudolph Valentino 1

Hello all and welcome to Friday Facts! This week I’m after finding an article about Rudolph Valentino from 1951, which was written by Harold Queen for a publication called Coronet. This article was titled The Perfect Lover and I will reproduce it here over the coming weeks. What is interesting with this article is how much it reminds us that before the boyband mania, and before the Beatles and Elvis mania, before them all – there was Rudolph:

Rudolph Valentino 2Some of the crowd at Rudolph Valentino’s Funeral

“In the little theaters that feature old-time films, Rodolpho Alfonzo Raffaelo Pierre Filibert Guglielmi di Valentina d’Antonguolla still plays to packed houses. Thousands of aging matrons remember him as the beau ideal of the 1920s – the decade of the Charleston and Al Capone. Some 35 women named their children after him, and three others committed suicide on his account. Indeed, few figures of modern times (early 1950s) have inspired the mass hysteria that swirled about the life, loves, and final curtain call, at 31, of Rudolph Valentino, ‘The Perfect Lover’.”

Rudolph Valentino 3Rudolph Valentino in Blood and Sands

“The supple, olive-skinned son of an Italian veterinarian was both the expression of his era and in a sense its part-creator. He gave the language a new word – “sheik” – to describe the great brotherhood of street-corner musketeers who pomaded their hair and grew long sideburns in imitation of their hero.”

Rudolph Valentino 4Rudolph Valentino: The Sheik

“When he first flashed across the screen in flowing white burnoose, women everywhere rushed to purchase Sheik hats and frocks, Sheik cosmetics and handbags. He gave the tango its greatest lease on life in America, and few survivors of that dim age fail to remember the hand-wound phonographs grinding out The Sheik of Araby.”

Rudolph Valentino 5Valentino the Man

“The Valentino cult frequently took more exuberant turns. The platinum slave bracelet he wore on his wrist, his reported communications with the other world, and his extravagances fed a steady stream of material into the newspapers and magazines of the day. In his public appearances, admirers often stripped him of hat, tie, pocket handkerchief, even his cuff links.”

Natacha with RudolphNatacha with Rudolph

“When his second wife, Natacha Rambova, left New York during an enforced separation until his divorce became final, reporters on the train intercepted his telegrams and rushed them into headlines before she had seen them. When the couple later appeared together in a nationwide dance tour, thousands gathered at sidings to catch a glimpse of them in their special railway car.”

Rudolph Valentino 6Rudolph Valentino Performing

The Sheik‘s acting rated high by standards of the silent screen, and it is likely that he would have done equally well in talking pictures. His pantherish grace, exotic features, and sturdy physique contributed to the actual tremors many women experienced when seeing him on the screen. The young Italian had the added faculty of completely absorbing the personality of his screen characters. In preparing for Blood and Sand, he studied the art of bullfighting with a retired toreador, spoke nothing but Spanish, grew sideburns, and learned to walk and swagger like a true hero of the ring.”

Rudolph Valentino 8Do what I tell you woman, for I am The Sheik!

“The prime reason for his extraordinary appeal, however, lay in the fact that, to millions of moviegoers, the name Valentino spelled romance. In the workaday world of Harding and Coolidge, he was the high lama of escape. For the small price of a ticket, he secured for his devotees temporary admission to a dream world of daring gallantry and erotic suggestiveness. This talent lifted the dark-eyed tango partner from the dance hall to a Hollywood manor, a stable of exotic foreign cars, and the title of ‘The Screen’s Greatest Lover’.”

Rudolph Valentino 9Look into my eyes; now look very deeply!

“The man to whom these honours came was born in southern Italy in 1895. In 1913, his family packed him off to the New World, where, according to legend, he landed a job as a bus boy and dancing partner, with meals thrown in. This was the age of Irene and Vernon Castle, and the dance craze was sweeping America. So Guglielmi turned professional, making the vaudeville circuits of the period.”

Rudolph Valentino 10Well, I can’t sing and I can’t dance …, but I look okay, I suppose!

“In 1915, when Italy entered the war, Rodolpho applied for the Italian Air Force but was turned down because of poor eyesight. A try at the British Royal Flying Corps brought similar results. Finally he joined a musical company making ts way to California, but when he landed in San Francisco, both job and income ended. It was at this point that a friendly screen actor, Norman Kerry, thought the young Italian had film possibilities and staked him to an apartment near Hollywood.”

Rex Directing RudolphRex Ingram directing Rudolph Valentino

Well. that’s the first section of the article The Perfect Lover by Harold Queen from 1951. I hope you’re enjoying learning about the history of this legendary silent-film star, who took the silent era by storm with his dark, exotic looks and his handsome, mysterious features. Women loved and wanted him, men envied and idolized him, and Rex Ingram made him; find out how next week!

Cover of "The Sheik / The Son of the Shei...

Cover via Amazon

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Constance Talmadge, silent film actress with R...

Constance Talmadge, silent film actress with Rudolf Valentino (Photo credit: scismgenie)

Valentino - The Sheik

Valentino – The Sheik (Photo credit: DonnaGrayson)

Cover of "Blood and Sand: Silent Classic&...

Cover of Blood and Sand: Silent Classic

Rudolph Valentino and Natacha Rambova

Rudolph Valentino and Natacha Rambova (Photo credit: The Loudest Voice)

promotional image of screen writer June Mathis...

promotional image of screen writer June Mathis on the set of Blood and Sand with star Rudolph Valentino (Photo credit: Wikipedia)