Friday Facts

Cover of magazine "The Flapper" for ...

Cover of magazine “The Flapper” for November 1922. Shows actress Billie Dove in football uniform. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hello Again and welcome to Friday Facts, where I grab an article or any sort of a write-up about the silent-era by those who lived through it. This week I’ve come across an article from November 1922, of an interview with Colleen Moore by Gladys Hall for the Chicago Daily News. This article went under the heading The Flapper and it had a byline of Flappers Here to Stay, Says Colleen Moore. What is also noticeable in the article is the header which states: ‘Not For Old Fogies’, so this article which rightly was promoting the cause of Feminism, was at the same time indulging in agism – Mmmmm! Brilliant article though, so please enjoy:

Film Still of Colleen Moore as "Pink"...

Film Still of Colleen Moore as “Pink” Watson with Joe Yule Jr., who would later become Mickey Rooney, in Orchids and Ermine. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“One day, not so very long ago, Colleen Moore and I had luncheon together. I don’t suppose I ever met anybody so enthusiastic as Colleen. Even about the subway, upon which – or rather, within which – she had been spending most of her New York visit, frequently getting lost, but gallantly persisting, none the less. Flappers came up – in conversation, I mean – and I found Colleen as enthusiastic for the maligned misses as most doleful individuals are against them!”

Flapper #2

Flapper #2 (Photo credit: girlwparasol)

“‘Why’, said Colleen, with her head slightly to one side, an alert little manner, sort of characteristic of a humming bird, ‘Why, I’m a flapper myself!’ Colleen is twenty-one, correct flapper age, at any rate – but somehow, until she mentioned it, I really hadn’t catalogued her as precisely that. Flappers don’t generally do as much as Colleen, and they are more blase – about the subway.”

Page from magazine "The Flapper" for...

Page from magazine “The Flapper” for November 1922. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“A flapper,” Colleen went on, with wisdom, ‘is just a little girl trying to grow up – in the process of growing up. She wears flapper clothes out of mischief – because she thinks them rather smart and naughty. And what everyday, healthy, normal little girl doesn’t sort of like to be smart and naughty?”

Colleen Moore in Lilac Time

Colleen Moore in Lilac Time (Photo credit: cliff1066™)

“‘Little Lady Flapper is really old-fashioned; but in her efforts not to let anyone discover that her true ideal is love-in-a-cottage, she ‘flaps’ in the most desperately modern manner. Left to her own devices she would probably dance and flirt just as girls have always done – but honest, I don’t think she’d wear her skirts so short!”

Colleen Moore

Colleen Moore (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“‘She likes her freedom, and she likes to be a bit daring, and snap her cunning, little manicured fingers in the face of the world; but fundamentally she is the same sort of girl as grandmamma was when she was young. The chief difference is that she has more ambition, and there are more things for her to wish for, and a greater chance of getting them. She demands more of men because she knows more about their work.”

colleen moore dance

colleen moore dance (Photo credit: carbonated)

“‘She uses lipstick and powder and rouge because, like every small girl, she apes her elders. She knows more of life than her mother did at the same age because she sees more of it. She knows what she wants and what she is doing, all of the time – and she meets life with a small and an eager, ardent hope. She’s a trim little craft and brave!”

Flapper in 1920s..

Flapper in 1920s.. (Photo credit: joanneteh_32(On Instagram as Austenland))

“‘The flapper has charm, good looks, good clothes, intellect and a healthy point of view. I’m proud to ‘flap’ – I am!'” -END

Colleen moore 1

Colleen moore 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And so you have it. Great article and great interview, in fact there wasn’t a whole lot of difference between the struggles of life and the quest to enjoy life today compared to ninety years ago. This is another article that has being republished on the http://www.oldmagazines.com website; I hope you’re enjoying them; I’ll be back next week with another! Bye for now!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

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Friday Facts

Rudoph Valentino as Amos Judd

Rudoph Valentino as Amos Judd (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Good day and welcome to the second part of our 1951 article titled The Perfect Lover, which was written by Harold Queen, published in the Coronet Magazine and is about the extremely dark featured, very handsome, Rudolph Valentino. Last week we were looking at his early days in Hollywood, so what happened next:

 

Cover of "The Four Horsemen of the Apocal...

Cover of The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse

“For a time, Valentino (whose name by now had changed), went unrecognized. He took bit parts at $5 a day and lived sparingly. Gradually, he got better parts and salaries up to $150 a week. In 1920, Rex Ingram, casting for The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, selected Valentino as Julio, the story’s young Argentine hero. In the film, Valentino danced the tango, and when The Four Horsemen opened in New York, word filtered back that he was sensational. Valentino promptly asked for a $50-a-week and was curtly refused.”

 

English: Rudolph Valentino in "The Sheik&...

English: Rudolph Valentino in “The Sheik” (www.silentgents.com) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“A woman, E. M. Hull, had written a book, The Sheik, describing love and lesser matters on the Sahara Desert. When Valentino appeared in the film version, sheik became a national byword. Ten thousand letters a week jammed the star’s mailbox. His salary leaped to $1,000 a week.”

 

English: Wanda Hawley & Rudolph Valentino in T...

English: Wanda Hawley & Rudolph Valentino in The Young Rajah – cropped screenshot (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Valentino’s succeeding films, and particularly The Young Rajah, involved him in a battle with his employers, whom he accused of putting him in inferior productions. The result was a court injunction banning him from stage or screen until he fulfilled his contract. He and Rambova then undertook the dance tour, which was sponsored by the makers of a beauty clay. The salary, $7,000 a week, enabled him to maintain his well-publicized extravagances, which sometimes landed him in debt by as much as $100,000.”

 

Rudolph Valentino and Natacha Rambova

Rudolph Valentino and Natacha Rambova (Photo credit: The Loudest Voice)

“When he returned to the screen after a two-year absence, Valentino found that, if anything, his popularity had spurted. Millions came to see him in Monsieur Beaucaire, The Sainted Devil, The Cobra, and as a Cossack in The Eagle. He was separated from Rambova, and the public took avid delight in his new emotional attachments – Vilma Banky, and later the tempestuous Pola Negri.”

 

Valentino with the Arabian Stallion Jadaan. Pu...

Valentino with the Arabian Stallion Jadaan. Publicity photo for Son of the Sheik, 1926 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“For the New York opening of Son of the Sheik, thousands waited in a withering heat wave. Some 4,000 more gathered at the stage door to mob their idol, who was making a personal appearance.”

Rudolph Valentino, one of the first "teen...

Rudolph Valentino, one of the first “teen idols” of the 20th century (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And there we leave it for this week, but not to worry, I’ll be back next week for the concluding part of this hugely interesting article about one of the first ever cinematic heart-throbs. So for now, Slán Leat!

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

 

A Quote on Thursday

Buster KeatonQuoted by Buster Keaton:

“Is Hollywood the cruelest city in the world? Well, it can be. New York can be like that, too. You can be a Broadway star here one night, and something happens, and then you’re out – nobody knows you on the street. They forget you ever lived. It happens in Hollywood, too.”

Paulette GoddardQuoted by Paulette Goddard:

You live in the present and you eliminate things that don’t matter. You don’t carry the burden of the past.”

Charlie ChaplinQuoted by Charlie Chaplin:

Failure is important. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself.”

Fatty ArbuckleQuoted by Fatty Arbuckle:

Life is a pie fight and then you die.

Clara BowQuoted by Clara Bow:

We had individuality. We did as we pleased. We stayed up late. We dressed the way we wanted. I used to whiz down Sunset Boulevard in my open Kissel, with several red Chow dogs to match my hair. Today, they’re sensible and end up with better health. But we had more fun.”

Cecil B DeMille

Quoted by Cecil B. DeMille:

What I have crossed out I didn’t like. What I haven’t crossed out I’m dissatisfied with.

A Quote on Thursday

Kevin Brownlow

Kevin Brownlow:

“The silent film was not only a vigorous popular art; it was a universal language – Esperanto for the eyes!”

Jean Dujardin

Jean Dujardin in The Artist

Geoffrey Parfitt:

“Never take a blind date to a silent film!”

Rudolph Valentino

Rudolph Valentino in Rex Ingram’s The Sheik

Rudolph Valentino:

“To generalize on women is dangerous. To specialize on them is indefinitely worse.”

Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton:

“From the time I was 7 or 8 years old, we were the roughest knockout act that was in the history of the theater, not only in the United States but all over Europe as well. We used to get arrested every other week – that is, the old man would get arrested. The first crack out of the box here in New York state, the Keith office raised my age two years, because the original law said that no child under 5 could even look at the audience, let alone do anything. So they said I was 7. And the law read that a child can’t do acrobatics, can’t walk a wire, can’t juggle – a lot of these things – but there was nothing said in the law that you can’t kick him in the face or throw him through a piece of scenery. On that technicality, we were allowed to work, although we’d get called into a court every other week, see.”

David Lean

David Lean

David Lean:

“Nowadays, if you look up Ingram’s record, you see him described as ‘a great pictorialist’. You know, they accuse me of being pictorial. It probably has to do with Rex Ingram. Anyway, I’m really grateful for it.”

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee