Midweek Matinee

Decaying Hollywood MansionsDecaying Hollywood Mansions

Another website recommendation today. If you want a painless and freewheeling way to explore Hollywood’s past, visit Decaying Hollywood Mansions on Facebook. The site is dedicated to stills and other ephemera of several golden ages of cinema, from the earliest experiments with motion to the frontier wildness of the early 1970s.

John WayneJohn Wayne in The Searchers

The page is a labour of love by Charles Lieurance, who is a relentless truffler in the cinematic undergrowth. Recent highlights of his “multi-media spookhouse of cinema’s past” include a vintage comic-book version of The Searchers, and this fabulous PR shot from 1928:

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Kudos if you recognised the young Joan Crawford. If you also clocked the grizzled Gibson Gowland (last seen hereabouts in Stroheim’s Greed), give yourself a gold star.

Scenography for the movie Greed. 1926.

Scenography for the movie Greed. 1926. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cropped screenshot of Joan Crawford from the f...

Cropped screenshot of Joan Crawford from the film Category:Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? (film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Kevin McGee

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Midweek Matinee

Silent But Deadly: The Dawn of the Martial Arts Film

Greed

Ask a film buff for the longest silent movie ever made. Chances are, you’ll get the answer Greed. Erich Von Stroheim’s self-proclaimed master-work was the nine-hour tale of a young California miner who turns to dentistry, marries, wins the lottery, and ends up handcuffed to a dead man in the Nevada desert.

Erich von Stroheim

It was an extraordinary piece of work, as far as we can tell. Stroheim‘s script survives, as does the novel it was based on. Much of the footage has been lost, however. The best that can be seen now is a heavily-chopped copy. Even at two hours, it is occasionally a punishing experience. But how many works of narrative art could survive so well the loss of three-quarters of their length?

The Burning of the Red Lotus

It was nowhere near the longest silent, however. That honour may go to 1928’s The Burning of the Red Lotus. At 27 hours, it is better thought of as a series than as a single movie. Though it was entirely lost by 1940, it’s impact as the first major martial arts movie continued to be felt with a series of remakes extending through to the 1950s.

Enter the Dragon

To feel its impact today, we have to look at the works it influenced, even at second hand. So do yourself a favour. If you haven’t seen Enter The Dragon, or haven’t watched it since your misspent youth, dig out a copy this week. It is forty years old on Friday, and it hasn’t aged a day.

Posted by Kevin McGee