Thursday Quote: 1930s Cinema

Following on from last week, here’s a whole bunch more quotes taken from the films of the 1930s. You may recognize some of them and others may be new to you, but please enjoy:

Cropped screenshot of William Powell as Floren...

Cropped screenshot of William Powell as Florenz Ziegfeld from the trailer for The Great Ziegfeld (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Great Ziegfield (1936):

I’ve got to have more steps. I need more steps. I’ve got to get higher, higher!”


Cover of "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (Remaste...

Cover of Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (Remastered)

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936):

And I say the fellas who can make the hill on high should stop once in a while and help those who can’t. That’s all I’m trying to do with this money. Help the fellas who can’t make the hill on high.”

Modern TimesEnd Shot of Modern Times

Modern Times (1936):

“…a practical device which automatically feeds your men while at work. Don’t stop for lunch. Be ahead of your competitor…the feeding machine will eliminate the lunch hour, increase your production, and decrease your overhead.”


English: L. to R. : William Powell, Carole Lom...

English: L. to R. : William Powell, Carole Lombard & Jean Dixon in My Man Godfrey – cropped screenshot (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My Man Godfrey (1936):

Oh, Money, money, money! The Frankenstein Monster that destroys souls.”


Rose Marie (1936)Rose Marie (1936)

Rose Marie (1936):
Your dream prince, reporting for duty!”


The Awful TruthThe Awful Truth (1937)

The Awful Truth (1937):
I wouldn’t go on living with you if you were dipped in platinum.”


A Day at the RacesA Day at the Races

A Day at the Races (1937):

Emily, I have a little confession to make. I really am a horse doctor. But marry me and I’ll never look at any other horse.”


Snow white 1937 trailer screenshot (8)

Snow white 1937 trailer screenshot (8) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937):
Magic Mirror on the Wall. Who is the fairest one of all?”

Way Out WestLaurel & Hardy in Way Out West

Way Out West (1937):
Now that you’ve got the mine, I’ll bet you’ll be a swell gold digger.”


Errol Flynn as Robin Hood.

Errol Flynn as Robin Hood. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938):
Overtaxed, overworked and paid off with a knife, a club or a rope.”
Why, you speak treason!”
Fluently.”


Cover of "Boys Town"

Cover of Boys Town

Boys Town (1938):
In a pinch I can be tougher than you are, and I guess maybe this is the pinch.”

You Can't Take it with YouYou Can’t Take it with You

You Can’t Take It With You (1938):
Well, sir, here we are again.”


The Adventures of Sherlock HolmesThe Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939)

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939):
“Elementary, my dear Watson.”


Gone With The Wind Scene 1Gone With The Wind Scene 1

Gone With The Wind (1939):
Lawdy! We got to have a doctor! I don’t know nothin’ ’bout birthin’ babies.”


Gone With The Wind Scene 2Gone With The Wind Scene 2

Gone With The Wind (1939):
I’ll think about it tomorrow. Tara! Home. I’ll go home, and I’ll think of some way to get him back! After all, tomorrow is another day!”


Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939)Scene from Goodbye, Mr. Chips

Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939):
“…a pity I never had children. But you’re wrong…I have…thousands of them…thousands of them…and all boys!”


Mr. Smith Goes to WashingtonMr. Smith Goes to Washington

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939):
I wouldn’t give you two cents for all your fancy rules if, behind them, they didn’t have a little bit of plain, ordinary, everyday kindness and a – a little looking out for the other fella, too…”


Ninotchka Scene from Ninotchka

Ninotchka (1939):
“…It’s midnight. One half of Paris is making love to the other half.”


StagecoachStagecoach

Stagecoach (1939):
Well, they’re saved from the blessings of civilization.”


The Wizard of OzThe Wizard of Oz

The Wizard of Oz (1939):
Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.”


The WomenThe Women

The Women (1939):
There’s a name for you ladies, but it isn’t used in high society – outside of a kennel.”


Wuthering HeightsWuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights (1939):
I killed you. Haunt me then. Haunt your murderer. I know that ghosts have wandered on the Earth. Be with me always. Take any form. Drive me mad. Only do not leave me in this dark alone where I cannot find you. I cannot live without my life. I cannot die without my soul.”

Cover of "Young Mr. Lincoln: The Criterio...

Cover via Amazon

Young Mr. Lincoln (1939):
No, I think I might go on a piece. Maybe to the top of that hill. ”


Frankenstein

Frankenstein (Photo credit: twm1340)

And that’s that for this week. I think you’ll agree that there is quite a lot of memorable quotations from some vintage classic films of the Golden Age of early film making. I hope you’ve enjoyed it and sure I’ll be back next week with some quotes taken from the movies of the 1940s. So Goodbye for now!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

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Midweek Matinee

SilentFilmLost

Here’s a strange fact about cinema. More than half the films every made no longer exist.

 Buster Keaton 1

Studios churned out product in the early days, with little thought of preservation. Most films had no future before television. Every few years a previous hit would go on general re-release, but these were always monster hits like Gone With The Wind. Other films just took up room.

English: Buster Keaton wearing his trademark p...

English: Buster Keaton wearing his trademark porkpie hat in the 1922 film The Blacksmith Available at http://us.imdb.com/gallery/mptv/1301/Mptv/1301/20676_0002.jpg?path=gallery&path_key=0012945 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The highly combustible celluloid was a fire hazard too, so the prudent producer would strip the film for re-usable minerals and destroy the waste. The fact that some of that waste contained the life work of a Buster Keaton or a Rex Ingram didn’t really register. How many people archive their newspapers, or their Facebook page?

Every so often, happily, something is plucked from the maw of time. The latest rediscovery is five new minutes of Keaton’s 1922 comedy The Blacksmith. You can read about the rediscovery, and catch a glimpse of the footage, in this excellent article from the (other) Guardian: Here

Posted by Kevin McGee

A Laugh on Tuesday: Gone with the Wind!

Gone With The Wind 1

Gone With The Wind 2

Gone With The Wind 3

Gone With The Wind 4

Gone With The Wind 5

Gone With The Wind 6

Gone With The Wind 7

Gone With The Wind 8

Gone With The Wind 9

Gone With The Wind 10

Gone With The Wind 11

Gone With The Wind 12

Gone With The Wind 13

Gone With The Wind 14

Laugh Now, Laugh Later

Laugh Now, Laugh Later (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And for something completely different … well, from Gone with the Wind that is. How about this wee silent short titled Black Oxfords, which is a Mack Sennett from 1924. Till next week, have an ol’ laugh!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee