A Quote on Thursday

babes01Laurel & Hardy in Babes in Toyland

Laurel & Hardy in Babes in Toyland:

Stan: “You better come up dead or alive!”

Ollie: “Now how can he come up dead if he’s alive?”

Stan: “Let’s drop a rock on him. Then we’ll make him dead when he’s alive.”

 

Rudolph Valentino FuneralRudolph Valentino Funeral

Rudolph Valentino (Last Words):

Don’t pull down the blinds. I feel fine. I want the sunlight to greet me!”

 

Erich von StroicheimErich von Stroicheim

Erich von Stroheim:

I was reared in an atmosphere where a great deal of attention was paid to women’s hairdressing.”

 

Monica BellucciMonica Bellucci

Monica Bellucci:

When you see a silent movie, you understand everything that’s going in from the images because the images are so strong.”

 

Bettie DavisBettie Davis

Bettie Davis:

I do not regret one professional enemy I have made. Any actor who doesn’t make an enemy should get out of the business.”

 

W. C. FieldsW. C. Fields

W. C. Fields:

Now don’t say you can’t swear off drinking; it’s easy. I’ve done it a thousand times.

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

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A Quote on Thursday

ver_hardy_&_Mrs_HardyOliver Hardy about to be chastised by the Mrs in Blockheads

Oliver Hardy in Blockheads (1938):

Oliver Hardy: But, Dear, I haven’t seen Stan in 20 years.
Mrs. Hardy: I couldn’t see him in a hundred years.

dore_schary_portrait_lgDore Schary

MGM Production Chief  Dore Schary when asked who he thought were the great Hollywood Pioneering Directors :

D. W. Griffith, Rex Ingram, Cecil B. DeMille, and Erich von Stroheim – in that order.”

Playwright Robert SherwoodRobert Sherwood working through all the hardships of having a painter over his shoulder

Playwright Robert Sherwood on Rex Ingram and Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse:

… the grandiose posturing of D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille appear pale and artificial in the light of this new production.

stan_laurel___sons_of_the_desertStan Laurel in Sons of the Desert

Stan Laurel:

You can lead a horse to water, but a pencil must be lead.

 

D. W. GriffithD. W. Griffith

D. W. Griffith:

I am fond of depicting the lives of young folks for one thing, and if you don’t have parts for girls or young men, you must absolutely have young people to fill them – that is generally acknowledged now.”

Lillian Gish

 

Lillian Gish with her ‘Come and get me eyes!’

Lillian Gish:

Young man, if God had wanted you to see me that way, he would have put your eyes in your bellybutton.”

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Silent Take: “Despicable Me” circa 1922

Despicable Me 1922

Those wonderful people at Movies, Silently are at it again. Have a look at their take of what Despicable Me circa 1922 might have looked like:

Silent Take: “Despicable Me” circa 1922.

Midweek Matinee

Silent But Deadly: The Dawn of the Martial Arts Film

Greed

Ask a film buff for the longest silent movie ever made. Chances are, you’ll get the answer Greed. Erich Von Stroheim’s self-proclaimed master-work was the nine-hour tale of a young California miner who turns to dentistry, marries, wins the lottery, and ends up handcuffed to a dead man in the Nevada desert.

Erich von Stroheim

It was an extraordinary piece of work, as far as we can tell. Stroheim‘s script survives, as does the novel it was based on. Much of the footage has been lost, however. The best that can be seen now is a heavily-chopped copy. Even at two hours, it is occasionally a punishing experience. But how many works of narrative art could survive so well the loss of three-quarters of their length?

The Burning of the Red Lotus

It was nowhere near the longest silent, however. That honour may go to 1928’s The Burning of the Red Lotus. At 27 hours, it is better thought of as a series than as a single movie. Though it was entirely lost by 1940, it’s impact as the first major martial arts movie continued to be felt with a series of remakes extending through to the 1950s.

Enter the Dragon

To feel its impact today, we have to look at the works it influenced, even at second hand. So do yourself a favour. If you haven’t seen Enter The Dragon, or haven’t watched it since your misspent youth, dig out a copy this week. It is forty years old on Friday, and it hasn’t aged a day.

Posted by Kevin McGee