Midweek Matinee

lantern logoClick Image to vew lantern.mediahlist website

An extraordinary new resource for early film buffs has just gone live. Lantern.mediahist.org is an online collection of film books and magazines from the earliest days of film up to 1963. it is fully searchable, and all the materials may be downloaded and reused.

Rex Ingram's Four Horsemen of the Apocalyse

A sample search for “Rex Ingram” returned 1,707 entries. Some of these will refer to the actor of the same name, of course, but within minutes I was reading an on-set report from our director’s Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Ingram had just been clattered with an umbrella, wielded by a sweary Algerian dwarf.

Will retribution follow? If you want me, I’ll be in 1924.

 

Posted by Kevin McGee

Why Nenagh – National Heritage Week

National Heritage WeekClick Image for Full Brochure

I have a special Why Nenagh post to celebrate National Heritage Week. This will take place between August 17th to August 25th, 2013. As part of the national celebrations there are a number of events to take place in Nenagh town, so why not click on the brochure above to view the very busy schedule that will take place in Nenagh town and why it could be a very good idea to travel to Nenagh town as a visitor, tourist or just site-seeing in one of Ireland’s original heritage towns.

TIME TRAVELLING IN NENAGH?

Medeval FairVisit Nenagh Castle on Saturday 24th August and you will be in for a surprise.  You may think you have travelled back in time to when the castle was built for in the grounds surrounding it will be a Mediaeval Fair.  Stalls and booths will be displaying crafts and weaponry of the time, and there will be an opportunity to witness first hand real 13th Century combat!

Paddy ColePaddy Cole in Action

In contrast in the adjacent church grounds at the same time there is the Peoples’ Picnic where the Nenagh Mint Jazz Band, Ebony, and special guest Paddy Cole will be performing and entertainment for younger visitors will be provided in the form of Bouncy Castles and face painting.

Nenagh CastleNenagh Castle in all its Beauty

So whether you prefer a real castle or a bouncy one, come along to Nenagh between 11.00 and 5.00 on Saturday 24th August and you will be in for a rare treat.

Admission is free, mediaeval dress optional!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Republished Book: Scorned

ScornedScorned New Cover

A bit of news concerning one of the festival committee members. Michael McGee, Chairman of the Nenagh Silent Film Festival and author of the novel Scorned, has announced that the novel Scorned has now being re-released as an eBook in the Amazon Kindle Store. The same book will also be available on other eBook platforms like Smashwords in the coming days. This is a re-edited version of Scorned and the cover has also being changed. The novel can be reached on Amazon Kindle by clicking the image above. Watch out for an Anthology of Short Stories coming soon also!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Tony Winward Production

A Trip of the Mind

Tony Winward, who is one of our Great Supporters, has posted the following production on Youtube: http://youtu.be/BQRGIJcx1Qc. A Trip of the Mind is well worth viewing and we are delighted to highlight this for Tony. If anyone else out there has any productions you want the Nenagh Silent Film Festival Social Network, please contact us and send us a link! We’d be only too delighted to help promote our supporters!

Midweek Matinee

Jay Stowitts with Rex IngramJay Stowitts as the Satyr in The Magician with Great Silent Film Director Rex Ingram, Cannes, 1926

We hope to have news soon about a Dublin screening for Rex Ingram’s The Magician, with its Nenagh-premiered live soundtrack by Eoin Mac Ionmhain. Eoin’s work is stunning, of course, but is not the only composer or performer specializing in silent film. If you’re looking for the thrill of accompanied silents, we’ll bring you occasional news of other acts to look out for.

 The Cabinet of CaligariThe Cabinet of Caligari

Minima are making a big splash on the UK circuit, beloved of everyone from the Guardian to the plaid-sideburned trend-hounds of the Daily Telegraph. As well as old favourites like Nosferatu and Caligari, they bring an eerie touch to some of the silent era’s weirder efforts.

The Seashell & the ClergymanThe Seashell & the Clergyman

One of the more exciting oddities on Minima’s list is The Seashell and the Clergyman. Written by Antonin Artaud, and heavily influenced by Freud and Surrealism, it preceded the eyeball-splitting ant-fest Un Chien Andalou by a whole year.

Un Chien Andalou Un Chien Andalou

The British Board of Film Classification gave The Seashell and the Clergyman one of the greatest reviews ever. The film was “apparently meaningless,” they said, “but if there is a meaning, it is doubtless objectionable.”

 The ClergymanThe Seashell & the Clergyman

Case closed? Judge for yourself with a slightly blurry copy here on Youtube! Don’t forget to click learn more about today’s topic and also to view of the productions that are mentioned! Till next week then!

Posted by Kevin McGee

 

Friday Facts

journoheadline

Some facts I found online about silent film that were published on www.oldmagazinearticles.com/silent_movie_history_article in 1947 by journalist Richard G. Hubler.

The Jungle

Film production companies were fierce busy back in the silent era, how about averaging three movies per week.

Tom Hanks

With that sort of work, what type of salary were some of the early film production crews on, well how about a good pay for a Hollywood film executive which would be around $50.00 per week.

Silent Film Extras

And then there were the film extras who were on about $1.50 per day. (Did they get their meals provided for as well I wonder)

Silent Film Director

Film directors did a bit better though, they were on about $150.00 per week. (No wonder they all lived in luxury)

cameraman

And sure Cameramen were also well thought of with a salary of $80.00 per week.

RemmingtonTypewriter

Scriptwriters had to be very prolific, since they were averaging about $25 per script – must have been very heavy work on an old type-writer though.

Money Behind the Movies

And finally, Money must have really stretched far back then: About $500.00 for a big-budget production back in the silent-era – no wonder they could afford to squeeze out three movies per week. More next week. Log in and find out what new facts I have to reveal.

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Charlie’s Sunday Quote

Image

All I need to make a comedy is a park, a policeman and a pretty girl.~ Charlie Chaplin

A Charlie Snippet

Don’t forget to Join Us  and follow us at nenaghsilentfilmfestival.wordpress.com and receive a Nenagh Silent Film Festival update on a regular basis. We Love Silent Film  and we want to keep the memories of the Silent Film Greats like Rex Ingram, Charlie Chaplin, Laurel & Hardy, Buster Keaton, Keystone Kops, etc Alive, so come ‘n and Join Us. We want to see You on our Supporters List!