Why North Tipperary: The Baronies

Map of the baronies of County Tipperary in Ire...

Map of the baronies of County Tipperary in Ireland; taken from Atlas and cyclopedia of Ireland, p.267 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As has being mentioned many a time on this Blogsite, North Tipperary is a very historic region of the island of Ireland. As well there being the North and South Riding’s, there are also the baronies of either part of the county, but I’m gonna focus on the baronies of North Tipperary.Over all there are six baronies in North Tipperary, but what are baronies? Well a barony is a subdivision of a county, with North Tipperary being subdivided in the baronies of Eliogarty, Ikerrin, Ormond Upper, Ormond Lower, Owney and Arra, plus Slieverdagh, after the Norman conquest. So lets take a closer look at each of these baronies (as is described in Wilkepedia):

Surviving west gable of the 12th-century Roman...

Surviving west gable of the 12th-century Romanesque church in Roscrea. This church was in use until 1812 when most of it was demolished with the exception of this gable. It serves now as gate to the Church of Ireland parish church. (See entry 1843 in Jean Farrelly and Caimin O’Brien: Archaeological Inventory of County Tipperary: Vol. I – North Tipperary, ISBN 0-7557-1264-1.) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Eliogarty

The chief town is Thurles and the baroney lies between Ikerrin to the north, where the chief town is Roscrea, Kilnamanagh Upper to the west, where the chief town is Borrisoleigh and Middle Third to the south, where the chief town is Cashel. The ancient territory of Éile obtained its name from pre-historic inhabitants called the Eli, about whom little is known beyond what may be gathered from legends and traditions. The extent of Éile varied throughout the centuries with the rise and fall of the tribes in occupation. Before the 5th century A.D. the details of its history which can be gleaned from surviving records and literature are exceedingly meagre, obscure and confusing. During this century however Éile appears to have reached its greatest extent, stretching from Croghan Bri Eli (Croghan Hill in Offaly) to just south of Cashel (in Corca Eathrach Eli). The southern part of this territory embraced the baronies of Eliogarty and Ikerrin, a great part of the modern barony of Middlethird, the territory of Ileagh, and portion of the present barony of Kilnamanagh Upper.

English: Coat of arms of County Tipperary, Ireland

English: Coat of arms of County Tipperary, Ireland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

By the 8th century, the territory of Ancient Éile had broken up into a number of petty kingdoms: the O’Carrolls occupied the northern portion, the O’Spillanes held Ileagh (Ileigh) while the Eóganacht Chaisil had annexed Middlethird. The O’Fogartys held what is now the barony of Eliogarty, while to the north of them, at least some time later, were O’Meaghers of Ikerrin. The River Nore, at its position between Roscrea and Templemore, although just a small stream at this point, is usually taken as the southern limit of Ely O’Carroll territory.

Ikerrin

The cheif town of Ikerrin is Roscrea, while the baroney lies between Eliogarty to the south and Ormond Upper to the west, whose chief town is Toomevara. As a county ‘peninsula’, it is surrounded on three sides by counties Offaly and Laois.

When County Tipperary was split into North and South Ridings in 1836, Ikerrin was allocated to the north riding. However, the neighbouring barony of Kilnamanagh was split into Upper and Lower half-baronies, being allocated to the north and south ridings respectively.

Tipperary shown in Herman Moll's New Map of Ir...

Tipperary shown in Herman Moll’s New Map of Ireland (1714) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ormond Upper

The chief townland of Ormond Upper is Toomevara and this barony lies between Ormond Lower to the north, where the chief town is Nenagh, Kilnamanagh Upper to the south, Owney and Arra to the west, where the chief town is Newport and also Ikerrin to the east. The O’Meara’s had an entensive territory in the barony; the name of their chief residence, Tuaim-ui-Meara, is still retained in the village of Toomavara.

Gramscis cousin 11:14, 12 July 2006 (UTC)

Gramscis cousin 11:14, 12 July 2006 (UTC) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ormond Lower

The chief town of Ormond Lower is Nenagh and this barony lies between Ormond Upper to the south-east and Owney and Arra to the south-west. As a ‘peninsula’, it is surrounded on three sides by counties Galway and Offaly.

Owney and Arra

This barony, whose chief town is Newport, lies between Ormond Lower to the north, Kilnamanagh Upper to the south and Ormond Upper to the east. To the west lies the River Shannon, which separates it from County Limerick.

Kilnamanagh Upper

The chief town of Kilnamanagh Upper is Borrisoleigh, while the baroney lies between Ormond Upper, Kilnamanagh Lower of South Tipperary, whose chief town is Dundrum and Eliogarty to the east.

Nave, looking east.

Nave, looking east. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And so they are the baronies of North Tipperary. Filled with mountains of ancient history, of legendary heroes, betrayal, murder, beautiful scenery, mystic trails; this and much, much more, but you won’t know for sure until you pay us a visit and taste North Tipperary for yourself. See you soon and bye for now!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

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