A Quote on Thursday: 1950’s Part II

Welcome to Part Two of my collection of quotes from films created in the 1950’s. Some cracking ones and some classic films … can you remember these:

Marty (1955)Scene from Marty

Marty (1955):

“All right, so I’ll go to the Stardust Ballroom. I’ll put on a blue suit, and I’ll go. And you know what I’m gonna get for my trouble? Heartache. A big night of heartache.”

Mister RobertsScene from Mister Roberts

Mister Roberts (1955):

“Captain, it is I, Ensign Pulver, and I just threw your stinking palm tree overboard. Now, what’s all this crud about no movie tonight!”

James Dean, "Rebel Without a Cause",...

James Dean, “Rebel Without a Cause”, 1955 (Photo credit: thefoxling)

Rebel Without a Cause (1955):

“You’re tearing me apart! You, you say one thing, he says another, and everybody changes back again!”

Marilyn Monroe's skirt blows upwards in the 19...

Marilyn Monroe’s skirt blows upwards in the 1955 film The Seven Year Itch directed by Billy Wilder. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 The Seven Year Itch (1955):

“It’s just my imagination. Some people have flat feet. Some people have dandruff. I have this appalling imagination…”

To Catch a Thief (1955) features Hitchcock on ...

To Catch a Thief (1955) features Hitchcock on a bus alongside Cary Grant. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To Catch a Thief (1955):

“You want a leg or a breast?”

English: Screenshot from the trailer of Invasi...

English: Screenshot from the trailer of Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956). Film trailers from before 1964 are in the public domain. Source: http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/index.jsp?cid=87210. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956):

“Look, you fools. You’re in danger. Can’t you see? They’re after you. They’re after all of us. Our wives, our children, everyone. They’re here already. You’re next!”

Cover of "The King and I (50th Anniversar...

Cover via Amazon

The King and I (1956):

 “When I shall sit, you shall sit. When I shall kneel, you shall kneel. Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.”

Screenshot from the film The Searchers directe...

Screenshot from the film The Searchers directed by John Ford. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Searchers (1956):

“Let’s go home, Debbie.”

Cropped screenshot of Edward G. Robinson from ...

Cropped screenshot of Edward G. Robinson from the trailer for the film The Ten Commandments. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Ten Commandments (1956):

“So let it be written, so let it be done.”

Cover of "The Bridge on the River Kwai"

Cover of The Bridge on the River Kwai

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957):

But don’t you see. It’s a matter of principle. If we give in now, there’ll be no end to it. No…I’m adamant. I will not have an officer from my battalion working as a coolie!”

The Incredible Shrinking ManScene from The Incredible Shrinking Man

The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957):

“That’s silly, honey. People just don’t get smaller.”

Tony Curtis as Sidney Falco and Burt Lancaster...

Tony Curtis as Sidney Falco and Burt Lancaster as J. J. Hunsecker (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sweet Smell of Success  (1957):

“I’d hate to take a bite out of you. You’re a cookie full of arsenic.”

Cropped screenshot of Tyrone Power from the tr...

Cropped screenshot of Tyrone Power from the trailer for the film Witness for the Prosecution (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Witness For the Prosecution (1957):

“Killed him? She executed him.”

Cover of "Vertigo (Collector's Edition)"

Cover of Vertigo (Collector’s Edition)

Vertigo (1958):

“Well, I’ll wear the darn clothes if you want me to – if-if you’ll just, just like me.”

Cropped screenshot of Charlton Heston from the...

Cropped screenshot of Charlton Heston from the trailer for the film Ben Hur (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ben-Hur (1959):

“Your eyes are full of hate, Forty-One. That’s good. Hate keeps a man alive.”

North By Northwest

North By Northwest (Photo credit: Stewf)

North by Northwest (1959):

“…in the world of advertising, there’s no such thing as a lie. There’s only the expedient exaggeration. You ought to know that.”

Cropped screenshot from the trailer for the fi...

Cropped screenshot from the trailer for the film Rio Bravo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rio Bravo (1959):

“I guess they’ll let you in the front door from now on.”

Some Like It Hot Scene from Some Like It Hot

Some Like It Hot (1959):

“Look at that! Look how she moves. That’s just like Jell-O on springs. She must have some sort of built-in motors. I tell you, it’s a whole different sex!”

Well that’s my film quotes from this post, but I’ll be back soon with another collection of film quotes – this time from the 1960’s, so watch this space. And that’s a wrap!!!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

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Fun Size Review: The Prisoner of Zenda (1922)

I’m Baaaacccckkkk!!!! Get ready to be flooded with posts over the coming days as I try to catch up with the last two weeks, but first of all have a butchers of this post from Movies Silently of the Rex Ingram production: The Prisoner of Zenda!!! Follow Link below and Enjoy:

The Prisoner of Zenda

Fun Size Review: The Prisoner of Zenda (1922).

 

Celebrating Richard Harris

One of the main motives behind the Nenagh Silent Film Festival was to celebrate a local film-maker who had succeeded on a global scale. The same urge is behind another boutique festival which launched its programme today. The Richard Harris Film Festival takes place in Limerick, of course, from December 6th to 8th this year.

It would please the great man immensely. Not only does it feature possibly his greatest performance, in This Sporting Life, but it also offers a platform to emerging film-makers in its shorts programme – and includes a rugby match.

Image

You can find the full programme online here. It’s well worth supporting:

http://richardharrisfilmfestival.com

Why North Tipperary: Paranormal Legends 2

Leap Castle

Welcome back, here’s the second part of the Nenagh Silent Film Festival’s post which looks at North Tipperary Paranormal Legends. This will conclude this post and I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed putting it together:

Monahinsha AbbeyMonahinsha Abbey

Local Legends
Location: Monahinsha, Roscrea
Timeline: Unknown

Now here’s a strange one. Near Roscrea there’s a ruined church called Inishnameo, which may also be called Monahinsha. The story behind this goes that up to a couple of hundred years ago there was a fine lake at this spot with two islands in the centre of the lake. The larger of these lakes hosted a monastery which was founded by St. Hilary, while the smaller of these islands hosted a smaller chapel, but both islands also had their own legends. For the larger of the islands it was said that no female of any species could set foot on the island and survive, and legend has it that this story was tested with several female dogs and cats, while the the bushes and trees of the island was said to be filled with male birds, but no females who avoided the island as if the plague resided there. With regards the smaller of the islands, it was said that a person couldn’t die on this island no matter how sick they were and if a person on the island had an infliction, they would just waste away until they begged to face death by being taken from the island rather than suffering anymore. The lake around these islands was drained by the landowner about two hundred years ago and he barred all pilgrims from the area henceforth. No-one knows if the curse of these islands still persist to this day, so would you like to visit and find out for yourself?

Phantom CoachPhantom Coach

Night Coach
Location: Timoney Park, Roscrea
Timeline: Unknown

In Timoney Park, Roscrea, there is a legend that a phantom coach is often seen carrying the shades of the Parker-Hutchinson family towards their home, so watch out if you see a coach approaching in this area on late dark evenings, because you’d never know whats inside.

Sopwell CastleSopwell Hall

Haunted Screams
Location: Sopwell Castle
Timeline: Unknown

After Cromwell and his hordes  rampaged throughout the land, he rewarded some of his military leaders with land and castles and here at Sopwell Castle he rewarded the seat to one Thomas Sadleir. Sadleir changed the name of the premises to Sopwell Hall, which is a name that persists to this day. No matter what the name of the premises though, there is still a haunted scream which has being heard regularly within its walls. These screams are followed by the sound of a body being dragged down a staircase, which is thought to be the result of a body being dropped down the stairs. This manifestation is said to be a regular occurance as if is history is repeated again and again of a spirit which refuses to rest. The question is why and what horrible past is hidden within these historical walls?

View from the Devils Bit 2

View from the Devils Bit 2 (Photo credit: Donncha Carroll)

Devil’s Bit
Location: Templemore
Timeline: Since Ancient Times

Legend has it that the devil was being chased from Ireland by St. Patrick, but the devil came across a mountain near where Templemore is now located. For some reason or another the devil then decided to take a chunk from this mountain and hurled it in the air and the same lump of rock finished up where the Rock of Cashel is now situated, while the mountain range has forever since, is seen with a very noticeable large chunk missing out of it. Another version of this story says that after biting into the mountain his tooth fell out and formed the Rock. Of course, the legend has a few flaws, especially, well, its being around a bit longer than when St Patrick was around converting the locals, but there’s another version of this story. It has being well written of how the forming Christian church manipulated ancient legends to suit their own needs. An ancient legend states that an Irish hero was chasing a creature call the Cratnoch from the island. This creature gave birth to a number of other-worldly creatures including the Devil, but had met its match in Fionn Mac Cumhaill (whay-hay, Up our side). This thing was being chased out of Ireland until it came to the mountains near Templemore. Trying to slow down Fionn, it immediately bit a chunk out of the mountain and threw it at the Irish warrior, but this landed where the Rock now lays, while Fionn eventually caught up with the creature in Lough Derg, and supposedly defeated it there. So whatever you believe, or whether you don’t believe at all, the haunting, wonderful scene from the Devil’s Bit is very much well worth a visit.

Victorian PolicemanA Victorian Policeman

Haunting Manifestation
Location: Timoney, Roscrea.
Timeline: Since 1860

There is a story from the townland of Timoney, which is situated near Roscrea, of a local policeman back in the 1860’s named Dyer, who once swore to protect the area he patrolled ‘dead or alive’. After his death in the 1860’s, locals reported his ghost carrying out his promise. Is he still around this spot patrolling the townland from any wrong-doers, well why not visit and see for yourself?

Leap Castle

Leap Castle (Photo credit: AlisonKillilea)

A Collection of Hauntings

Location: Leap Castle.
Timeline: Since 1250

Leap CastleAnd so I’ve left the best till last. Just beyond the North Tipperary border into Offaly there lies the haunting legend of Leap Castle, which is known as the most haunted place in Ireland. Widely considered Ireland’s most haunted castle, Leap Castle in Offaly could teach Tim Burton a thing or two about the macabre. Centuries of odd accidents, strange occurrences and ill-repute can all be traced back to one family: The O’Carrolls.

The O’Carroll clan built Leap Castle around 1250 as their family stronghold and it passed from generation to generation without incident. Until there came a time when two ambitious brothers challenged each other for dominion over the castle and grounds. One brother was a priest, the other a successful military man. The two had never seen eye-to-eye.

Leap castleThe priest was giving mass in the chapel attached to the castle one evening when his brother burst through the doors and plunged his sword into his heart. Brother killing brother is an unspeakable sin, a desecration of the natural order. Since that day a relentless gloom clings to the castle. A mysterious ‘entity’ has ever since stalked the lower levels and dungeons of Leap.

During the 1900s workmen restoring the chapel discovered a hidden wall, concealing a room with a gruesome purpose. Instead of a floor, there was an eight-foot drop onto a wicked spike. The workmen removed layer after layer of human skeletons that were piled atop each other.

These are just a portion of the haunting stories linked to Leap Castle, and to this day locals dare not enter the castle grounds, but you can if you are daring enough… If a strange and ghastly smell should trespass upon your senses, run as fast as you can or you may be another ghastly page in Leap’s history. Hope you enjoyed the second part of a look at North Tipperary’s paranormal legends and I look forward to putting another one together for you next week. Boo for now!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Charlie’s Sunday Quote

Charlie Chaplin and Jackie Coogan in The Kid

Charlie Chaplin and Jackie Coogan in The Kid (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

We think too much and feel too little.” ~ Charlie Chaplin

Hope you are enjoying these Sunday quotes from Charlie Chaplin and I hope you enjoy this hilarious video from Youtube of Charlie Chaplin in The Bank.

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Friday Facts: Hollywood’s Adoloescence

Quotation from Woodrow Wilson's History of the...

Quotation from Woodrow Wilson’s History of the American People as reproduced in the film The Birth of a Nation. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Welcome back to Friday Facts and to the article Hollywood’s Adolescence by Richard E. Hubler. Last week I reproduced the first half of this article and we left it where the author was referring to how filming began to be brought indoors, with an orchestra playing at each shoot, while sets were built practically on top of each other. So here’s the concluding part of this wonderful article:

Cameraman“Even cameramen had temperament. Their stock excuse for quitting was: “The light is getting yellow.” Only cameramen could detect this quality in the sunlight so it always worked. Yellow light invariably spoiled negatives, but more than one director noticed that it set in just in time for his cameraman to get to the races.”

“Since a rival company had just completed a three-reel picture, Universal decided to do the stupendous thing. They issued orders to make a four-reeler, but on the safe subject of the Spanish-American War. The director shot it in eight days – a long schedule. Universal, then in  financial straits, tucked away the negative which represented its rehabilitation.”

D. W. Griffith“That night the studio was razed by a huge fire – and the negative was burned. The director summoned his cast and cameraman and shot the whole affair on a single day – from eight in the morning to five at night.”

“A not uncommon bonus for meritorious actions was a white enamel Simplex car, capable of 120 miles an hour. It was the custom to surround this monster with a solid bumper of railroad iron. A pastime acceptable to the motion picture colony, but looked upon with disfavor by the police and citizenry, was driving this creation into streetcars.”

“The motion picture writer began to come into his own – as the ‘titler’. Griffith invented his famous Came The Dawn“. Ralph Spence was possibly the most famous of these terse word artists. He was able to change the whole meaning of a picture, insert comedy or tragedy, simply by adroit one-line titles.”

The Birth of a Nation

The Birth of a Nation (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“In 1915, D. W. Griffith issued his epochal The Birth of a Nation. It marked the end of motion picture puberty. It introduced the screen as an art. It demonstrated that long pictures were feasible, high box-office prices obtainable, and that the camera was a medium that owed nothing to any other source. In a word, ‘class’ had come to Hollywood. The motion picture industry was never to be the carefree jerry-producing business it had been.” -END

Well that completes another wonderful article filled with plenty of facts from the glorious early days of Hollywood. I hope you’ve enjoyed this and will join me again next week, when I’ll come up with another fact-filled article based around the great silent-era.

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee