Friday Facts

Cover of magazine "The Flapper" for ...

Cover of magazine “The Flapper” for November 1922. Shows actress Billie Dove in football uniform. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hello Again and welcome to Friday Facts, where I grab an article or any sort of a write-up about the silent-era by those who lived through it. This week I’ve come across an article from November 1922, of an interview with Colleen Moore by Gladys Hall for the Chicago Daily News. This article went under the heading The Flapper and it had a byline of Flappers Here to Stay, Says Colleen Moore. What is also noticeable in the article is the header which states: ‘Not For Old Fogies’, so this article which rightly was promoting the cause of Feminism, was at the same time indulging in agism – Mmmmm! Brilliant article though, so please enjoy:

Film Still of Colleen Moore as "Pink"...

Film Still of Colleen Moore as “Pink” Watson with Joe Yule Jr., who would later become Mickey Rooney, in Orchids and Ermine. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“One day, not so very long ago, Colleen Moore and I had luncheon together. I don’t suppose I ever met anybody so enthusiastic as Colleen. Even about the subway, upon which – or rather, within which – she had been spending most of her New York visit, frequently getting lost, but gallantly persisting, none the less. Flappers came up – in conversation, I mean – and I found Colleen as enthusiastic for the maligned misses as most doleful individuals are against them!”

Flapper #2

Flapper #2 (Photo credit: girlwparasol)

“‘Why’, said Colleen, with her head slightly to one side, an alert little manner, sort of characteristic of a humming bird, ‘Why, I’m a flapper myself!’ Colleen is twenty-one, correct flapper age, at any rate – but somehow, until she mentioned it, I really hadn’t catalogued her as precisely that. Flappers don’t generally do as much as Colleen, and they are more blase – about the subway.”

Page from magazine "The Flapper" for...

Page from magazine “The Flapper” for November 1922. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“A flapper,” Colleen went on, with wisdom, ‘is just a little girl trying to grow up – in the process of growing up. She wears flapper clothes out of mischief – because she thinks them rather smart and naughty. And what everyday, healthy, normal little girl doesn’t sort of like to be smart and naughty?”

Colleen Moore in Lilac Time

Colleen Moore in Lilac Time (Photo credit: cliff1066™)

“‘Little Lady Flapper is really old-fashioned; but in her efforts not to let anyone discover that her true ideal is love-in-a-cottage, she ‘flaps’ in the most desperately modern manner. Left to her own devices she would probably dance and flirt just as girls have always done – but honest, I don’t think she’d wear her skirts so short!”

Colleen Moore

Colleen Moore (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“‘She likes her freedom, and she likes to be a bit daring, and snap her cunning, little manicured fingers in the face of the world; but fundamentally she is the same sort of girl as grandmamma was when she was young. The chief difference is that she has more ambition, and there are more things for her to wish for, and a greater chance of getting them. She demands more of men because she knows more about their work.”

colleen moore dance

colleen moore dance (Photo credit: carbonated)

“‘She uses lipstick and powder and rouge because, like every small girl, she apes her elders. She knows more of life than her mother did at the same age because she sees more of it. She knows what she wants and what she is doing, all of the time – and she meets life with a small and an eager, ardent hope. She’s a trim little craft and brave!”

Flapper in 1920s..

Flapper in 1920s.. (Photo credit: joanneteh_32(On Instagram as Austenland))

“‘The flapper has charm, good looks, good clothes, intellect and a healthy point of view. I’m proud to ‘flap’ – I am!'” -END

Colleen moore 1

Colleen moore 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And so you have it. Great article and great interview, in fact there wasn’t a whole lot of difference between the struggles of life and the quest to enjoy life today compared to ninety years ago. This is another article that has being republished on the http://www.oldmagazines.com website; I hope you’re enjoying them; I’ll be back next week with another! Bye for now!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

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Thursday Quotes: 1940s Cinema – Part 1

This screenshot shows Sydney Greenstreet and H...

This screenshot shows Sydney Greenstreet and Humphrey Bogart in a discussion about whether Sam (Dooley Wilson) will come to work for Greenstreet. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Welcome back to our weekly look at quotations connected to the world of cinema. In recent weeks I have looked at quotations taken from films of the 1920s and 1930s, but this week I’m going to take my first look at quotations taken from films which were released in the 1940s. So how many of these pictures do you remember, or even better, can you recall these famous cinematic quotes?

Trailer for the 1940 black and white film The ...

Trailer for the 1940 black and white film The Grapes of Wrath. John Carradine as Jim Casy, former preacher. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Grapes of Wrath (1940):
Well, maybe it’s like Casy says. A fella ain’t got a soul of his own – just a little piece of a big soul. The one big soul that belongs to everybody…Then it don’t matter. I’ll be all around in the dark. I’ll be everywhere – wherever you can look. Wherever there’s a fight so hungry people can eat, I’ll be there. Wherever there’s a cop beatin’ up a guy, I’ll be there. I’ll be in the way guys yell when they’re mad. I’ll be in the way kids laugh when they’re hungry and they know supper’s ready. And when the people are eatin’ the stuff they raise, and livin’ in the houses they build, I’ll be there, too.”

 

Trailer for the 1940 black and white film The ...

Trailer for the 1940 black and white film The Grapes of Wrath. John Qualen as Muley Graves, neighbor in Oklahoma. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Grapes of Wrath (1940):
That’s what makes us tough. Rich fellas come up and die and their kids ain’t no good, and they die out. But we keep a-comin’. We’re the people that live. They can’t wipe us out. They can’t lick us. And we’ll go on forever, Pa… ’cause… we’re the people.”

 

Scene from His Girl Friday

Scene from His Girl Friday (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

His Girl Friday (1940):
He’s got a lot of charm.”
He comes by it naturally. His grandfather was a snake.

 

My Little Chickadee

My Little Chickadee (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My Little Chickadee (1940):
Any time you’ve got nothing to do and lots of time to do it, come up.”

 

A screenshot of Judith Anderson and Joan Fonta...

A screenshot of Judith Anderson and Joan Fontaine in Rebecca (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rebecca (1940):
You’re overwrought, madam. I’ve opened a window for you. A little air will do you good. Why don’t you go? Why don’t you leave Manderley? He doesn’t need you. He’s got his memories. He doesn’t love you, he wants to be alone again with her. You’ve nothing to stay for. You’ve nothing to live for really, have you? Look down there. It’s easy, isn’t it? Why don’t you? Why don’t you? Go on. Go on. Don’t be afraid!”

 

The Thief of Bagdad (1940)

The Thief of Bagdad (1940) (Photo credit: mikemennonno)

The Thief of Bagdad:
This is the Land of Legend, where everything is possible when seen through the eyes of youth!”

 

A deep focus shot: everything, including the h...

A deep focus shot: everything, including the hat in the foreground and the boy (young Kane) in the distance, is in sharp focus. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Citizen Kane (1941):
I think it would be fun to run a newspaper.”

 

Sara Allgood as Beth Morgan and Roddy McDowall...

Sara Allgood as Beth Morgan and Roddy McDowall as Huw Morgan. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How Green Was My Valley (1941):
Men like my father cannot die. They are with me still – real in memory as they were in flesh, loving and beloved forever.”

 

Main title frame from the 1941 public domain t...

Main title frame from the 1941 public domain trailer for the Warner Bros. film The Maltese Falcon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Maltese Falcon (1941):
You, you imbecile! You bloated idiot! You stupid fathead!”

 

Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941)Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941)

Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941):
I was in love with a beautiful blonde once, dear. She drove me to drink. That’s the one thing I’m indebted to her for.”

 

Screenshot of the title screen of the trailer.

Screenshot of the title screen of the trailer. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Casablanca (1942):
Play it once, Sam, for old times’ sake…Play it, Sam. Play ‘As Time Goes By.'”

 

Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in a romant...

Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in a romantic scene. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Casablanca (1942):
Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walks into mine.”

 

Screenshot of Paul Henreid, Ingrid Bergman, Cl...

Screenshot of Paul Henreid, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains and Humphrey Bogart from the trailer for the film Casablanca. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Casablanca (1942):
If that plane leaves the ground and you’re not with him, you’ll regret it.”
No.”
– “Maybe not today, and maybe not tomorrow, but soon, and for the rest of your life.”

 

Cover of "The Major and the Minor (Univer...

Cover via Amazon

The Major and the Minor (1942):
Why don’t you get out of that wet coat and into a dry martini?”

 

screenshot of James Cagney from the trailer fo...

screenshot of James Cagney from the trailer for the film Yankee Doodle Dandy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942):
Ladies and gentlemen. My mother thanks you. My father thanks you. My sister thanks you. And I thank you.”

 

Cropped screenshot of Edward G. Robinson from ...

Cropped screenshot of Edward G. Robinson from the trailer for the film Double Indemnity (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Double Indemnity (1944):
It was a hot afternoon, and I can still remember the smell of honeysuckle all along that street. How could I have known that murder can sometimes smell like honeysuckle?”

 

Cover of "Going My Way (Universal Cinema ...

Cover via Amazon

Going My Way (1944):
Y’know, at one time I had quite a decision to make: whether to write the nation’s songs or go my way.

 

The added gas chamber ending was unneeded, Wil...

The added gas chamber ending was unneeded, Wilder realized, so he shelved it (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And so that’s it for this week’s Thursday Quotes, but if you’re enjoying reminising these quotes from some of your most favourite films, don’t despair, sure I’ll be back next week with another bunch just for you. Now after all these quotations from the world of classic film, don’t ya have that longing to throw on your favourite classics … and play them one more time!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee