What silent star are you? Take the personality quiz!

So which silent film star are you then? The good people at Movies Silently have put together a quiz for you to take to find out. Follow the links:

What silent star are you? Take the personality quiz!.

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Midweek Matinee

A BLACK LOOK AT SNOW WHITE

 Blancanieves3

The Artist was never going to revive the silent film industry, but it has made it easier for other film-makers to get their silent films made. None of these has scaled the commercial heights of Hazanavicius’ film, but at least one shows a comparable artistry.

 BlancanievesBlancanieves Poster

Blancanieves was Spain’s offering for the Best Foreign Film Oscar this year. It is a fervid retelling of the story of Snow White, but this is not a movie to babysit kids with. Not unless you want to explain what the nice lady in stockings was doing with the riding crop.

Pablo BergerPablo Berger

Director Pablo Berger is steeped in silent cinema, particular the work of the Frenchman Abel Gance. But in some ways his film is an anthology of prototypical Spanish concerns. There is flamenco, there is Francoist repression, and most of all there is bullfighting. The heroine ‘Blancanieves’ is the lost daughter of a dashing torero. Raised by a cruel stepmother, she blossoms into her father’s trade as the companion to seven dwarf matadors in a traveling show.

 Snow_White_ZombieSnow White Zombie

The fairy-tale outlines are clear, but what Berger catches most breathtakingly is the cruel and sinister edges of the fairy-tale world. This is more Grimm than Disney, more Gorey than Perrault.

 Blancanieves1

It is easy to see why Berger spent nearly ten years searching for funding, and only the unexpected success of The Artist could have convinced his investors to take the risk. Whether they recouped their money or not, they can at least be proud of their choice. The film is a revelation. At once sophisticated and brutal, romantic and filled with dread, Blancanieves manages to be both familiar and utterly unpredictable. Silent cinema has a new masterpiece, and it’s out now on DVD.

Posted by Kevin McGee

Why North Tipperary: National Monuments 1

Hello again and welcome to Why North Tipperary, where it is my goal to give you a reason to visit North Tipperary and why this part of Ireland is just as rich in heritage and scenery as any other part of the Emerald Isle, and even on a higher scale than most. This week I’m going to provide you with the first part of a list for a number of the National Monuments that are situated in the North Tipperary region, and it may surprise you to learn about the amount of history that is squeezed into the wonderful landscape of North Tipperary.

Lackeen CastleLackeen Castle

First up is Lackeen Castle, which is situated in the townland of Abbeyville, near the village of Lorrha. Lackeen Castle was built in the 12th century and is a fine example of an Irish Tower House. The description of this ancient building in the Abandoned Ireland website is that that it is: “Standing in a bawn, four stories high and featuring fine fireplaces. A straight stair runs up to the first floor and a spiral staircase runs to higher levels, the third storey is vaulted.” Lakeen belonged to Brian Ua Cinneide Fionn, who was cheiftain of Ormond and who died in 1588. His son Donnachadh inherited the Castle, but he was the last Ua Cinneide Chief of Lower Ormond and he ended up surrendering to Cromwell in 1653. The name Cinneide was anglicized to ‘Kennedy’ and these were the same clan as the great American political O’Kennedy clan. Indeed, the O’Kennedy’s ancestors ruled the lands of North Tipperary at one stage and they have castle ruins dotted all over the landscape. One piece of folklore about Lackeen Castle tells the tale that O’Kennedy from Lackeen Castle at one stage managed to catch a Pooka, who had being sent by a bunch of old hags to protect them as they went about the morbid act of robbing from the dead. A Pooka is a type of fairy that can shape shift and is capable of assuming a variety of terrifying forms. After O’Kennedy caught it he managed to bind it up an was about to bring it into Lackeen Castle, even though the Pooka was cursing him to the high heavens that it would burn the O’Kennedy with all it’s breath, but O’Kennedy was then persuaded by a servant called Tim O’Meara to let the Pooka go. O’Kennedy did, but only after receiving a promise from the Pooka that it would harm no breed, seed or generation of the O’Kennedy family. Can you imagine what might be lurking around Lackeen Castle, even to this day?

Ashleypark Burial MoundAshleypark Burial Mound

In Ashleypark, which is situated to the West of Ardcroney and to the North Of Nenagh town on the N52, lies a Neolithic tomb that is estimated to be about 5,000 years old. This burial mound was undisturbed in that length of time until a local farmer tried to bulldoze the mound and discovered the tomb about 30 years ago. There is no definite chamber beyond the widening of the passage, while the entire site is 90cm metres in diameter. The ditches surrounding the burial mound are in good condition, the mound itself is 26cm in diameter and the passage is off-centre – Some archaeologicalists who have viewed this site believe that this could mean there is a second passage in the mound somewhere. Amongst the cairn material there was found animal bones and the remains of an infant, while the remains of an adult male and another infant were found in the chamber itself. These remains were dated to 3350BC. More information can be found at www.thestandingstone.ie.

Ballynahow CastleBallynahow Castle

Ballynahow Castle, which is situated to the north-west of Thurles, is one of the few round tower houses in Ireland. This building was built by the Purcells in the 16th century and it’s initial use was to provide shelter to the local people against attacks from intruders. The castle is five stories high at 50 feet and it possesses four evenly-spaced machicolations, a mural staircase that is situated on the left of the building and two internal vaults, which cover two floors each. There is also a murder hole that is leading from a small chamber on the first floor, while on the upper floors there are a number of small musket holes that can be found near some of the principal windows. Also the top of the building at one stage had a conical timber roof.

The Timoney StonesThe Timoney Stones
The Timoney Stones, that are located in the Timoney Hills, south-west of Borris-in-Ossery and south-east of Roscrea, are described in The Standing Stone website as: “something of a mystery among scholars and in the Archaeological Inventory of Tipperary the stones are listed separately tot he other standing stones in the county.” In all there are roughly 121 standing stones, while it is estimated that about 90 others have been removed over time. The stones range in size from 30cm to approximately 2m and they are laid out in no identifiable pattern, which has led to discussion. Also, they are in close proximity to the Cullaun Stones and the authors of The Standing Stone website believe that this means that they were probably part of the same complex. There is a complete randomness about the Timoney Stones though, which follows no archaeological pattern and with a lot more suggestions to the the origins of these stones than any plausible answers, the mystery will persist.
 Holy Cross Abbey 1841Holy Cross Abbey 1841
Holycross Abbey is situated near Thurles and it is a restored Cistercian monastery, while the abbey itself takes it’s name from a relic of the True Cross. The story goes that around 1233, a fragment of the True Cross was brought to Ireland by the Plantagent Queen, Isabella of Angouleme. Isabella, who was the widow of King John, bestowed the relic on the original Cistercian Monastery in Thurles and thenceforth it’s name has been Holy Cross Abbey. Holy Cross has a mountain of history connected to it throughout the 800 years of English rule and rebellion against it in Ireland, and this was especially seen during the Reformation and on through to Cromwell’s invasion and it’s aftermath, when the Abbey fell into ruins. Although the Abbey became a scheduled national monument in 1880: “to be preserved and not used as a place of worship“, a Special Legislation in the Dáil on it’s 50th anniversary on January 21st, 1969, enabled Holy Cross Abbey to be restored as a place of Catholic worship. The Sacristan of St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican provided an authenticated relic of the Holy Cross, and the emblem of the Jerusalem Cross, or Crusader Cross, has been restored to the Abbey.  …. And so, I think I’ll leave it at that for this week, but I’ll be back next week with Part II of the National Monuments that are dotted all around North Tipperary – some more great reasons to visit North Tipperary.

Why North Tipperary National Monuments Map

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee