A Quote on Thursday: Silent Women

Mary PickfordMary Pickford

Mary Pickford:

Adding sound to movies would be like putting lipstick on the Venus de Milo.

 

Louise Brooks 1Louise Brooks

Louise Brooks:

“A well dressed woman, even though her purse is painfully empty, can conquer the world.”

 

Talluhah BankheadTallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Bankhead:
It’s the good girls who keep the diaries. The bad girls never have the time.”

 

Gloria SwansonGloria Swanson

Gloria Swanson:
As Daddy said, life is 95 percent anticipation.”

 

Anna May WongAnna May Wong

Anna May Wong:

“There seems little for me in Hollywood, because, rather than real Chinese, producers prefer Hungarians, Mexicans, American Indians for Chinese roles.”

 

Louise BrooksLouise Brooks

Louise Brooks:
Love is a publicity stunt, and making love – after the first curious raptures – is only another petulant way to pass the time waiting for the studio to call.”

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

 

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Midweek Matinee

Louise BrooksLouise Brooks

3EPKANO & LOUISE

Everyone who attended last year’s Nenagh Silent Film Festival remembers the band 3epkano. They provided the music for Murnau’s Nosferatu. It was a hell of a noise for four people to make. I think I saw someone afterwards counting the drummer’s hands.

Pandora's BoxPandora’s Box (1929)

They’ve expanded their silent-film repertoire to include another German masterpiece. This time it’s Pabst’s Pandora’s Box, a late silent movie starring the scandalous, and scandalously beautiful, Louise Brooks.

NosferatuNosferatu

Brooks is one of not many silent stars who could walk into a producer’s office today and emerge with a starring role. She also wrote one of the indispensable acting memoirs, Lulu In Hollywood. Marvel here at her looks, her art, and her ridiculously influential hairdo. And turn up your speakers: that’s 3epkano bringing the noise:

 

Posted by Kevin McGee

 

Why North Tipperary – National Monuments 2

Scene of Lough DergScene of Lough Derg

Hello and welcome to the second part of my look at the National Monuments of North Tipperary. Altogether I have looked at approximately 15 monuments in total, however, there are a few more, but any of the tourism offices of North Tipperary will gladly direct you to these. For now, read on and discover a number of good reasons to visit North Tipperary.

LiathmoreLiathmore

Near Thurles and close to Twomileborris lies the townland of Leigh or Leighmore, or even more correctly Liathmore. This townland is situated six miles of Thurles and is also close to Twomileborris and within this townland is a building of renowned antiquity and even some celebrity: an early monastery which was founded by the seventh century monk Mochoemóg. Mochoemóg was a nephew of St. Ita and he was also a friend of St. Fursey. There are two churches and the footings of a Round Tower situated here. It should also be mentioned that a Sheela na Gig is set into a door of one of the churches which is facing the remains of the Round Tower.

St Ruadhan's ChurchSt Ruadhan’s Church

In Lorrha village lies St. Ruadhan’s Church, which is dated from the 15th century. According to the Irish Antiquities website it has good east and west windows and a richly decorated west doorway. Irish Antiquities then goes onto state that a little further south the Church of Ireland building occupies part of an older church. This older section has a 15th century doorway decorated with floral designs and a pelican feeding her young with drops of her blood. In the graveyard is the decorated base of a High Cross and part of the shaft on another.

Roscrea Round TowerRoscrea Round Tower

There are a number of heritage sites in Roscrea town that are well worth visiting. There is the castle some people believe was built by King John of England in 1213, although some claim it was built in the mid-13th century. In the grounds of the castle there stands a building called Damer House, which is an 18th century building that according to the Discover Ireland website ‘exemplifies pre-Palladian architecture. Very close by to Roscrea Castle is St. Cronan’s Church and Round Tower. This is a Romanesque church with only the west facade remaining. Also nearby to these two buildings is the Franciscan friary which was founded in the 15th century. So you see there are plenty of reasons to visit Roscrea town.

Monaincha ChurchMonaincha Church

Not far from Roscrea is a place-name called Monaincha, which is from the Irish ‘Mainister Inse na mBeo‘ meaning ‘Island of the Living’. Back in the 8th century there was a small island here where a monastery was founded by St. Elair, but the land around the monastery was drained on the 18th century, which has left the monastery as a mound in a boggy field. The Celi De monks moved onto the existing island around the year 80 and brought with them a much stricter way of life. There is a church here at Monaincha which is dated to the 12th century, which according to the www.megalithicireland.com website contains a finely decorated romanesque west doorway and chancel arch. It goes onto state that at the end of the 12th century the monastery became Augustinian. There are the fragments of two crosses mounted together in front of the church which has some very weathered Celtic designs on the underside of the ring and north face. The base of the cross dates to the 9th century and although it is very weathered, it still bears carved horsemen.

Terryglass CastleTerryglass Castle

In Terryglass village there stands a 13th century square castle, which is believed to be one of only four of its kind in Ireland. There are round turrets at each corner, while according to the www.geograph.ie website the NE turret was originally accessible only by outside stairs. It goes onto state that the NW turret has circular stairs which are now blocked by a steel-pipe door. A dividing wall separates the ground floor in two and the castle looks down on Lough Derg.
Nenagh Castle

Nenagh Castle

Nenagh Castle is a unique Norman Keep that was built around 1200 by Theobald Walter, who was the 1st Baron Butler, while the fortress was completed by his son Theobald le Botiller around 1220. The Butlers were eventually declared the Earls of Ormond by the Norman invaders and Nenagh Castle was their principal seat until they moved to Kilkenny Castle in 1391. The family name went onto become the Marquis of Ormond, but James Butler, the last Marquess, died in 1997. There is a crown on top of the Nenagh castle that was added in 1861 by Bishop Michael Flannery, which he had hopped would become the bell tower of a Pugin designed cathedral, however this project was never completed. The Nenagh Castle has now become a major tourist destination on the mid-west region, with the development of the interior, which is now open to the public.Interior of the Castle Crown

Interior of Nenagh Castle Crown

Well, that’s all I have for you this week, but tune back this way in seven days and view a number of new reasons on ‘Why North Tipperary’ should be your holiday destination.Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Charlie’s Sunday Quote

Charlie Chaplin: City LightsCharlie Chaplin: City Lights

I went into the business for the money, and the art grew out of it. If people are disillusioned by that remark, I can’t help it. It’s the truth.” ~ Charlie Chaplin

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Friday Facts

New York Times (1914)New York Times (1914)

And Friday Facts is upon us once again. This week I’m going to reproduce an article I have found in The New York Times from May 26th 1914. The article may amuse you as it was written to introduce the readers to a new verb – The Verb – ‘To Film’:

Ye Olde DictionaryYe Olde Dictionary

“The verb ‘to film‘ having gained currency, it must be graciously admitted to the language. It will soon be in the ‘advanced‘ dictionaries and it must be recognized. The old idea of protecting the English language from invasion is extinct. To ‘film‘ means to make a picture for a ‘movie‘ show. ‘Movie‘ is a tolerably new word, too, but all the élite use it. The moving pictures are doing much more than revolutionize the language. They are broadening the public knowledge, making globe trotters of the stay-at-homes, showing us the wonders of the growth of plants and the development of animal life. As for their influence on the drama, they have none in any true sense. Moving pictures, even when they are accompanied by talking machines of the best quality, must always  be a feeble substitute for histrionism. The actor’s art is not to suffer. Whenever it is manifested it will get its reward.”

Shakespeare's Anthony and CleopatraShakespeare’s Anthony and Cleopatra

“But the theatrical stage has long survived without much real histrionism to brag of and the moving pictures outdo its best shows. They give you real ocean with towering waves instead of painted canvas, they present the story in motion, and sometimes in color, with such a variety of a changing scene as to satisfy the eye. Dr. Johnson would doubtless have found that moving pictures interested him more than Shakespeare’s Anthony and Cleopatra on account of their frequent changes of scene. When the villain throws the heroine off a cliff into a boiling torrent there is a real cliff and the torrent is authentic. No doubt, the present enormous popularity of the moving picture will abate in time, but some of the current picture shows are really marvels of selection, patience, and skill, and they will always survive as illustrations of travel, as aids to the understanding of natural history. As a substitute for the theatre they will do well enough until there is a revival of real histrionism, until great actors come again to exercise their ‘sway o’er hearts’. Meanwhile, whether 16,000,000 persons daily attend the moving pictures in this country, according to the evidence placed before the House Committee on Education at Washington, or only 6,000,000, which seems a more reasonable number, the vogue of the moving picture is surely at its height.”

The ArtistThe Artist

And so there you have it. The New York Times were convinced that the idea of motion pictures was just a passing fad, which in 1914 (99 years ago), was at its height. Who knew – eh? The verb ‘to film‘ has certainly entered the dictionary and there it will remain for a long time to come. Hope you enjoyed today’s edition of Friday Facts. I’ll be back next week with some more. And that’s a wrap!

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

A Quote on Thursday

Louis LumiereLouis Lumiere

Louis Lumiere:

The cinema is an invention without a future.”

 

Tom HanksTom Hanks (Castaway)

Tom Hanks (Regarding Castaway):

There was nothing to react to except wind and trees. It was like making a silent movie.

 

W. C. Fields with Mae WestW. C. Fields with Mae West

W. C. Fields:

The movie people would have nothing to do with me until they heard me speak in a Broadway play; then they all wanted to sign me for the silent movies.”

 

Walter MurchWalter Murch

Walter Murch:

When I’m actually assembling a scene, I assemble it as a silent movie. Even if it’s a dialog scene, I lip read what people are saying.”

 

George Sidney (MGM Director)George Sidney (MGM Director)

George Sidney:

I’ve had 79 to 80 years of show business. I started when I was 5 with a man called Tom Mix. I didn’t have time to go to school because I was in silent movies; I was in radio; I was in burlesque; I worked with the circus. I’m all show.”

 

John DoyleSilent Film Scene

John Doyle:

Imagine a silent movie studio.”

 

Slavoj ZizekSlavoj Zizek

Slavoj Zizek:

Cinema is the ultimate pervert art. It doesn’t give you what you desire – it tells you how to desire.”

 

Martin ScorseseMartin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese:

Cinema is a matter of what’s in the frame and what’s out.”

 

Werner HerzogWerner Herzog

Werner Herzog:

Read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read, read…if you don’t read, you will never be a filmmaker.”

 

Cecil B. DeMilleCecil B. DeMille

Cecil B. DeMille:

I might have remembered what my father once wrote to Henry George, “I never do anything by halves, and am half-hearted in no cause that I embrace.”

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee