Midweek Matinee

Acting Styles 1
BE NATURAL

One of the biggest problems people have with silent films is the acting style.

Lee StrasbergThe growing naturalism of the sound era culminated in the Method of Lee Strasberg’s Actors Studio. Derived from the Russiona theatre director and theorist Stanislavski, the Method emphasised inner life and emotional truth. If that truth expressed itself sometimes in muttering and uncertainty, then that was a fair price for truth.

Actors like Brando, Newman, Clift, Burstyn, Dean and Karl Marden moved far beyond the stage-school approach which made early sound films look like a slow day in Noel Coward’s living room. These guys were allowed to mumble. They were required to bump into the furniture.

If the upright style of Grant and Gable now looked old-fashioned, then the gesticulations of the silent era seemed positively antique. But even in that time, there were visionaries of naturalism. Some were actors, most notably Lillian Gish. One was a director, now forgotten, called Alice Guy-Blaché. Guy-Blaché’s cry was “BE NATURAL”. She had the motto hung on her studio wall.For more information on Ms Guy-Blaché, and for a chance to support a new film about her career, visit the Kickstarter site by following the link here!

And be natural.Lillian Gish

Posted by Kevin McGee

A Laugh on Tuesday

You’re welcome back again to ‘A Laugh on Tuesday”. I’ve included a clip of Laurel & Hardy taken from Way Out West. A talkie I know, but how else could we hear the hilarity of the two lads in their comical version of ‘The Trail of the Lonesome Pine‘. So tune in and enjoy.

Gene Wilder

FallingTower

Charlie Chaplin

South Park

Ted

Snatch

Psycho

Bitching

Hot Babes

Cinema Staff

Scum Utd

See y’all next week then when I’ll have some more funny memes and I’ll find another Youtube clip for you to enjoy! 😀

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Why Nenagh – Church Architecture

Old Church of IrelandOld Church of Ireland

Welcome back to my weekly post: Why Nenagh! This week is going to be a predominantly a picture Posting, because quite simply I think these pictures can tell their own story. I’m looking at the two main churches of Nenagh town, because I reckon the buildings themselves are fantastic and to be able to visit them and to take in their surroundings is another reason to visit Nenagh town. First up is the old Church of Ireland. It is situated at the end of Kenyon/Barrack Street, with the square tower dominating that area of the town. According to the Ormond Historical Society, there are records of a church on this site going back to 1615. This square tower was added to an existing building in 1760 and a new church was added in 1809. This remained the Church of Ireland place of worship until a brand new building was erected in 1860 on a new site at what is now known as Church Road. (Since we have already discussed about Nenagh being a town where the streets have more names, does anyone know of another name for this road?)

Old Pic of Nenagh COI Exterior of Nenagh COI Interior towards altar of Nenagh COI Interior towards rear of Nenagh COI Interior commenorations in Nenagh COI

The existing Church of Ireland rests nicely along Church Road, with the Nenagh Castle and the Roman Catholic Church situated alongside.

And so to St Mary of the Rosary Church in Nenagh town. Although there exists a second Roman Catholic Church in the town that is situated behind the hospital, there really is no comparison with regards their standard of architecture. St Mary’s was built in 1895 and the architect was Walter G Doolin.

Old Church Interior13 Old Church Exterior1Old Church Interior12  Church Interior10 Church Interior5 Church Interior7 Church Interior8 Church Interior9 Church Interior3 Church Interior2 Church Interior2 Church Exterior 1 Church Interior1 Design3 Design2 Design1  Church DoorwayChurch Tower2Church Tower

It was constructed by John Sisk and he used Lahorna stone and Portroe slate with the Portland stone of the arches being the only imported material that was used. Some examples of the designs that are found around the buildings itself can be seen in the some of the images that appear here. According to the Buildings of Ireland website, this church is a ‘detached cruciform-plan‘ church and it comprises of a gabled entrance front with corner turret and flanked by five-stage tower with spire to the south. The Buildings of Ireland report goes on to say that: ‘this church is an excellent example of large scale Gothic Revival architecture of the late-nineteenth century in Ireland. The exterior is notable for the finely-carved ashlar dressings, gargoyles and elaborate west-front doorway. The interior of the nave revives the quatrefoil columns found in some thirteenth-century Irish and English west country Gothic parish churches and its columns and pointed arches are of Portland stone. A series of fine mosaics executed by Oppenheim in 1911 culminate in the chancel of the church.”

ArdcroneyCOIArdcroney Church of Ireland

I couldn’t finish this post, without commenting on the fact that back in the 1990’s the Ardcroney Church of Ireland was taken apart brick by brick and rebuilt in Bunratty Folk Park – since seemingly this was done by numbering the bricks, I suppose this would have been some sort of a very intricate jig-saw puzzle. Anyways, if you do travel to Bunratty in the County of Clare, which is well worth a visit at any time of the year and it is about 45 minutes drive from Nenagh town, don’t forget when you view the small Church of Ireland, that it is an architectural delight from North Tipperary! Till next week so, when I will be looking at some of the fine draperies in Nenagh town.

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee