Silent Take: “The Dark Knight Rises” circa 1927

The Dark Knight Rises

What if The Dark Knight Rises was released around 1927? Movies, Silently takes a look, so why not have a gander who would possibly have been the Ben Affleck of the day – Click on Link:

Silent Take: “The Dark Knight Rises” circa 1927.

A Laugh on Tuesday – Public’s Reaction to Ben Affleck as Batman

Hello to all and welcome back to the ‘A Laugh on Tuesday’. Today I’m going to take a look at the public’s reaction to the announcement of Ben Affleck as the new Batman. It’s a little bit crazy to say the least, but do enjoy. Personally I think he’d make a good Batman, but some of these memes are absolutely hilarious, so do enjoy! “Hello I’m Ben – Ben the Batman!’

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Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Why Nenagh – Nenagh Castle

Nenagh CastleNenagh Castle

Did you know that Nenagh Castle had five large towers at one stage, which, back then, were thought to be the largest towers in Ireland and Britain? Or then there is the story of a local stern puritan, Solomon Newsome, who decided he wanted to blow up the castle remains because he reckoned the sparrows and other birds that were living on the ivy which was growing on the walls of the ruins were conspiring daily to steal his growing barley crop? Well, this week I’m going to take a look at Nenagh town’s most prominent building – Nenagh’s Legendary Castle, or the Nenagh Keep – so please join me on this historical trail; Another wonderful reason to visit Nenagh town and North Tipperary.

Butler Arms

First up, Nenagh Castle was built between 1200 and 1220 and this fortress was the main seat of the Butler family until the 14th century. Theobald FitzWalter le Boteler, 1st Baron Butler, was granted the land of the Barony of Ormond Lower by King John of England. The Butler’s were eventually driven out in 1391 to Gowran in Kilkenny, in no small part to pressure from the native O’Kennedy clan and their allies. The Butler’s, however, would later acquire Kilkenny Castle, which would remain their seat of power for the following 500 years.

Above: Butler Coat of Arms

O'Kennedy - Butler TreatyThe Original O’Kennedy Clan – Butler Treaty from 1336

In 1336, when the Butler’s were still in resident in Nenagh Castle, a peace treaty was signed between the O’Kennedy’s and James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond; Included in the treaty were terms of peace and grants of lands for the O’Kennedy clan. Six hundred and twenty seven years later, this original treaty was presented as a gift to President John Fitzgerald Kennedy, while he was on a state visit to Ireland. It can now be seen in the J. F. K. Library in Massachusetts. The terms of the treaty were eventually broke in 1347/8, when the O’Kennedy’s, O’Carroll’s and the O’Brien’s attacked the Castle. In the process the town of Nenagh was burned, but the attack on the Castle was unsuccessful.

Tomb of Richard ButlerDuring the sixteenth century, the first of a number of events occurred which would have historical consequences in relation to Nenagh Castle and Nenagh town. In 1533, the Castle was returned to the Butler’s from the hands of the Mac Ibrien family (the O’Brien clan) under Piers Butler, Earl of Ossory. Then in 1550 the town of Nenagh and the local Friary was burned again; this time by the O’Carroll clan, who must have been peed off about something or another. Onwards to 1641, and the town of Nenagh and it’s Castle was captured by Owen Roe O’Neill and his Irish forces, but this was short-lived, as Murrough O’Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin, retook the town. Then, in 1651 Cromwell’s troops paid Nenagh a visit and battered Nenagh Castle from high grounds to the East; the garrison eventually surrendered to Henry Ireton, who was Cromwell’s Parliamentary Deputy. In the aftermath, Ireton is said to have had the Castle’s Governor hung from the topmost window of the keep that is now known as Nenagh Castle. At the end of the Cromwellian Wars, the Castle was granted to Daniel Abbot, along with extensive lands, in lieu of payment form Cromwell, although the Castle was then returned again to the Butlers after the Restoration in 1660. (Image shows the tomb of Richard Butler, son of Piers Butler, resting in St Canice’s, Kilkenny.)

Nenagh Castle RuinsBut that’s not the end of the troubled times for Nenagh Castle! Following this, there are a couple of reports from different sources. One of them claims that during the Jacobite War, which is said to have initially began in 1688, Anthony O’Carroll took the Castle from James Butler, the 2nd Duke of Ormond, who was supporting William of Orange, but the fortress was retaken yet again in 1690 by General Ginkel, who was later to become the 1st Earl of Athlone. Another report states that during the Williamite Wars, Patrick Sarsfield came this way too and also burned Nenagh castle. What I can gather is that O’Carroll was fighting with Sarsfield and it’s a simple case that what one report is stating is the Jacobite Wars, the other is stating the Williamite Wars. But if that wasn’t enough for poor old Nenagh Castle, following the Williamite Wars, Nenagh Castle was dismantled so that it would not be used again in further conflicts, with William of Orange ordering its destruction so that it would be “rendered indefensible in ill hands“. (Image shows the ruined Nenagh Castle as it once was.)

Nenagh Castle Plan LayoutAnd that brings us to 1750, when a certain Solomon Newsome (he from the O’Newsomes over yonder) decided it would be a good idea to blow up the rest of the Castle because flocks of birds that were nesting in it’s remnants were destroying his barley crop nearby. (had they no scarecrows back then?) Seemingly this genius decided to undermine the Castle by digging a great hole underneath it in the hope that it would fall, but this didn’t work, so instead Newsome came up with an idea of using a barrel of gunpowder. It exploded alright, but all it did was make a great hole in the tower’s side, and so the tower, or the great Keep of the Nenagh Castle remained standing. (Image shows the layoutplans for Nenagh Castle)

Nenagh Castle 1And onto 1860, when Bishop Flannery initiated plans to build a Cathedral in Nenagh town. To do this, a lot of funds were needed and so a number of priests were sent to North America on a fund-raising mission. In the meantime, Bishop Flannery bought the Castle ruins and the surrounding lands, and he then set about restoring the Castle Keep so it could be incorporated in the new Cathedral he was building. Everything was going well until War again intervened; This time the American Civil War and so with funding drying up from the United States, Bishop Flannery’s plans came to an abrupt end. Even still, his endeavours had been a blessing to Nenagh Castle and it’s appearance. Bishop Flannery’s plans saw the uneven top of the tower was raised and dressed with a new parapet wall. There was also an area of land nearby that was known as ‘The Stony Field’ which was cleared up around this time with the building of the Town Hall and the local Court House, but I’ll come to that another day. (Old Photo of Nenagh Castle probably taken during the late 1800’s – the new crown is clearly visible as been newly laid.)

Nenagh Castle

But all of this history brings us right up to today. In recent times Nenagh Castle has been renovated and after being reopened by President Michal D. Higgins in 2012, it is now a museum that is open to the public, whereby you can walk right to the top for a completely unique panoramic view of the town and countryside. When you visit Nenagh town, this is most definitely a major tourist attraction that you do not want to miss. It is filled with history with a mountain of connections to Kings and Kingdoms, Rebels and Rebellions, Tyrants and Arsonists, Irish Clans and Celtic Leaders, and also an American President, and that’s just the start. It’s bloodied history is well behind it now, so come along and share in the experience of Nenagh Castle – another reason to visit Nenagh town! (Image shows Nenagh Castle under a stormy Tipperary Sky, but this Fine Keep has endured a lot more stormier times than just a drop of rain in its time.)

And finally to finish off this week’s post, here are a number of other images taken from Nenagh Castle. If anyone wants to add anything to this post, please leave a comment or contact us at nenaghsilentfilmfestival.wordpress.com, or even if there’s someone out there who might have spotted any inaccuracies in this post – I’m happy to be corrected. As things stand the information here has been gathered from a number of sources including: Hidden Tipperary, eBook Ireland, Tudor Place, JFK LibraryWikipedia and Irish Fireside. See y’all next week so.

Nenagh Castle

Castle Interior 2Castle Interior 2

 

 

 

 

 

A Few Interior Views of the Newly Renovated Nenagh Castle

Interior of Nenagh Castle

Below is a High Definition Scanned Image of Nenagh Castle. Click on Image for more details

Nenagh Castle HD

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Allow Mr. Valentino to serenade you! (Yes, quite literally, his vocal recordings survive!) Animated GIF

Movies, Silently have a gem on their site to mark the 87th anniversary of Rudolph Valentino’s death. If you follow the link below you’ll have an opportunity to hear Valentino serenading Agnes Ayres in The Sheik. Enjoy!

Allow Mr. Valentino to serenade you! (Yes, quite literally, his vocal recordings survive!) Animated GIF.

Questions from the Google: What’s a silent movie?

Don't be so dramatic!

Most of the questions you’ve always wanted to ask about silent film are answered here …, well some of them anyway. Check out this article by Movies, Silently! Click on Link Below:

Questions from the Google: What’s a silent movie?.

Silent Take: “True Grit” circa 1917

I’ve another post here from those good people at Movies, Silently. I love these ones whereby they look at contemporary or near modern films and apply them to what it is they would have looked like if they were released in the silent era. This week they are looking at True Grit. Brilliant!

 

Silent Take: “True Grit” circa 1917.

Friday Facts

The Birth of a NationThe Birth of a Nation Title

Hello and welcome back to Friday Facts. I’m currently looking through an article that was written by Lillian Gish in 1937, so here are some more extracts from the article The Birth of a Era by Lillian Gish from the State Magazine. The focus of this article was, if you remember based around the production of The Birth of a Nation and the experiences Lillian Gish had on the set with D. W. Griffith, amongst others.

Margaret Cameron in The Birth of a NaationMargaret Cameron in The Birth of a Nation

There was a standard call for rehearsal whenever there was rain or the sun disappeared, as at such times all cameras stopped, since it was before the days of artificial lights. During the rainy season there would be weeks of rehearsals, with Mr. Griffith outlining stories to be filmed far into the future. Some of them, including Faust and Joan of Arc, never reached the screen. We were rarely assigned parts, and the younger members of the company always rehearsed for the older members when the story was being developed, as all the ‘writing’ was done by Griffith as he moved groups of characters around a room.”

The Birth of a Nation Scene 1The Birth of a Nation Scene 1

When the story was ready to go before the camera, the older players who were to play the parts on the screen came forward and acted the parts they had been watching us rehearse for them. This method gave them the advantage of not being over-rehearsed, and also of watching the story quietly unfold before their eyes, giving them ideas that might have escaped had they not been kept fresh for the actual creation. It also taught the more inexperienced members what eventually would be expected of them.”

The Birth of a Nation Scene 2The Birth of a Nation Scene 2

At first I was not cast to play in The Clansman. My sister and I had been the last to join the company, and we naturally supposed, this being a big picture, that the main assignments would go to the older members. But one day while we were rehearsing the scene where the colored man picks up the northern girl gorilla-fashion, my hair, which was very blond, fell far below my waist, and Griffith, seeing the contrast in the two figures, assigned me to play Elsie Stoneman (who was to have been Mae Marsh). My sister, a child at the time, was to have played the girl of twelve, little sister to the Colonel.”

The Birth of a Nation Scene 3The Birth of a Nation Scene 3

Very often we would play episodes without knowing the complete story, or in which film Griffith was going to use them, as he shrouded his ideas in great secrecy for fear another studio would hear of them and get them on the screen first. Only Griffith knew the continuity of The Birth of a Nation in its final form. There was much anxiety, and many tears shed, over the assignment of parts, as we all wanted to prove our worth before it was too late, and with photography in its undeveloped state we knew we would be paseé by the time we reached eighteen.”

The Birth of a Nation Scene 4The Birth of a Nation Scene 4

And that’s all for this week’s Friday Facts. Thank you for reading and don’t forget to check in next week for the concluding part of the article The Birth of an Era by Lillian Gish. But also, please, if you have any facts from the silent-era you want to pass onto us, let us know by contacting us on our Contacts page. Good-luck for now then!

A Quote on Thursday

ver_hardy_&_Mrs_HardyOliver Hardy about to be chastised by the Mrs in Blockheads

Oliver Hardy in Blockheads (1938):

Oliver Hardy: But, Dear, I haven’t seen Stan in 20 years.
Mrs. Hardy: I couldn’t see him in a hundred years.

dore_schary_portrait_lgDore Schary

MGM Production Chief  Dore Schary when asked who he thought were the great Hollywood Pioneering Directors :

D. W. Griffith, Rex Ingram, Cecil B. DeMille, and Erich von Stroheim – in that order.”

Playwright Robert SherwoodRobert Sherwood working through all the hardships of having a painter over his shoulder

Playwright Robert Sherwood on Rex Ingram and Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse:

… the grandiose posturing of D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille appear pale and artificial in the light of this new production.

stan_laurel___sons_of_the_desertStan Laurel in Sons of the Desert

Stan Laurel:

You can lead a horse to water, but a pencil must be lead.

 

D. W. GriffithD. W. Griffith

D. W. Griffith:

I am fond of depicting the lives of young folks for one thing, and if you don’t have parts for girls or young men, you must absolutely have young people to fill them – that is generally acknowledged now.”

Lillian Gish

 

Lillian Gish with her ‘Come and get me eyes!’

Lillian Gish:

Young man, if God had wanted you to see me that way, he would have put your eyes in your bellybutton.”

 

Posted by Michael ‘Charlie’ McGee

Midweek Matinee

Acting Styles 1
BE NATURAL

One of the biggest problems people have with silent films is the acting style.

Lee StrasbergThe growing naturalism of the sound era culminated in the Method of Lee Strasberg’s Actors Studio. Derived from the Russiona theatre director and theorist Stanislavski, the Method emphasised inner life and emotional truth. If that truth expressed itself sometimes in muttering and uncertainty, then that was a fair price for truth.

Actors like Brando, Newman, Clift, Burstyn, Dean and Karl Marden moved far beyond the stage-school approach which made early sound films look like a slow day in Noel Coward’s living room. These guys were allowed to mumble. They were required to bump into the furniture.

If the upright style of Grant and Gable now looked old-fashioned, then the gesticulations of the silent era seemed positively antique. But even in that time, there were visionaries of naturalism. Some were actors, most notably Lillian Gish. One was a director, now forgotten, called Alice Guy-Blaché. Guy-Blaché’s cry was “BE NATURAL”. She had the motto hung on her studio wall.For more information on Ms Guy-Blaché, and for a chance to support a new film about her career, visit the Kickstarter site by following the link here!

And be natural.Lillian Gish

Posted by Kevin McGee